Tony Evers

Last updated

Tony and Kathy Evers in 2018 Kathy Evers with Tony Evers.jpg
Tony and Kathy Evers in 2018

Evers is married to his high-school sweetheart, Kathy. [100] They have three adult children and nine grandchildren. Evers had esophageal cancer before undergoing intensive surgery in 2008. [101]

Electoral history

Superintendent of Public Instruction (2001)

Tony Evers
Tony Evers - 2022 (cropped, longer).jpg
Evers in 2022
46th Governor of Wisconsin
Assumed office
January 7, 2019
Wisconsin Superintendent of Public Instruction Election, 2001
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Nonpartisan Primary, February 20, 2001 [102]
Independent Linda Cross 58,258 23.18%
Independent Elizabeth Burmaster 55,327 22.01%
Independent Tony Evers45,57518.13%
Independent Jonathan Barry36,13514.38%
Independent Tom Balistreri33,53113.34%
Independent Dean Gagnon15,2616.07%
Independent Julie Theis6,7832.70%
Scattering4580.18%
Total votes251,328 100.0%

Superintendent of Public Instruction (2009, 2013, 2017)

Wisconsin Superintendent of Public Instruction Election, 2009
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Nonpartisan Primary, February 17, 2009 [103]
Independent Tony Evers 89,883 34.99%
Independent Rose Fernandez 79,757 31.04%
Independent Van Mobley34,94013.60%
Independent Todd Price28,92711.26%
Independent Lowell Holtz22,3738.71%
Scattering1,4310.18%+0.06%
Total votes256,909 100.0% +7.89%
General Election, April 7, 2009 [104]
Independent Tony Evers 439,248 57.14%
Independent Rose Fernandez328,51142.74%
Scattering9050.12%+0.02%
Total votes768,664 100.0% +6.22%
Wisconsin Superintendent of Public Instruction Election, 2013
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
General Election, April 2, 2013 [105]
Independent Tony Evers (incumbent) 487,030 61.15% +4.01%
Independent Don Pridemore 308,05038.67%
Scattering1,4310.18%+0.06%
Plurality178,98022.47%
Total votes796,511 100.0% +3.62%
Wisconsin Superintendent of Public Instruction Election, 2017
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Nonpartisan Primary, February 21, 2017 [106]
Independent Tony Evers (incumbent) 255,552 69.43%
Independent Lowell E. Holtz 84,398 22.93%
Independent John Humphries27,0667.35%
Independent Rick Melcher (Write-in)3770.10%
Scattering7030.19%
Total votes368,096 100.0%
General Election, April 4, 2017 [107]
Independent Tony Evers (incumbent) 494,793 69.86% +7.71%
Independent Lowell E. Holtz212,50430.00%
Independent Rick Melcher620.01%
Scattering9300.13%-0.04%
Plurality282,28939.86%+17.39%
Total votes708,289 100.0% -11.08%

Wisconsin Governor (2018, 2022)

Wisconsin Gubernatorial Election, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Party Primary, August 14, 2018 [108] [109]
Democratic Tony Evers 225,082 41.77%
Democratic Mahlon Mitchell 87,92616.32%
Democratic Kelda Roys 69,08612.82%
Democratic Kathleen Vinehout 44,1688.20%
Democratic Mike McCabe 39,8857.40%
Democratic Matt Flynn 31,5805.86%
Democratic Paul Soglin 28,1585.23%
Democratic Andy Gronik 6,6271.23%
Democratic Dana Wachs 4,2160.78%
Democratic Josh Pade1,9080.35%
Write-ins2210.04%
Total votes537,719 100.0% +72.29%
General Election, November 6, 2018 [110] [111]
Democratic Tony Evers 1,324,307 49.54% +2.95%
Republican Scott Walker (incumbent)1,295,08048.44%-3.82%
Libertarian Phil Anderson20,2550.76%N/A
Independent Maggie Turnbull18,8840.71%N/A
Green Michael White11,0870.41%N/A
Independent Arnie Enz2,7450.10%N/A
Write-ins9800.04%-0.02%
Total votes2,673,308 100.0% +10.91%
Democratic gain from Republican
Wisconsin Gubernatorial Election, 2022
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
General Election, November 8, 2022
Democratic Tony Evers (incumbent) 1,358,774 51.15% +1.61%
Republican Tim Michels 1,268,53547.75%-0.69%
Independent Joan Ellis Beglinger27,1981.02%N/A
Write-ins1,9830.04%+0.04
Democratic hold

See also

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Political offices
Preceded by Wisconsin Superintendent of Public Instruction
2009–2019
Succeeded by
Preceded by Governor of Wisconsin
2019–present
Incumbent
Party political offices
Preceded by Democratic nominee for Governor of Wisconsin
2018, 2022
Most recent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded byas Vice President Order of precedence of the United States
Within Wisconsin
Succeeded by
Mayor of city
in which event is held
Succeeded by
Otherwise Mike Johnson
as Speaker of the House
Preceded byas Governor of Iowa Order of precedence of the United States
Outside Wisconsin
Succeeded byas Governor of California