Tony Gaudio

Last updated
Tony Gaudio
Gaudiotonycamera.jpg
Tony Gaudio, ASC
Born
Gaetano Antonio Gaudio

(1883-11-20)November 20, 1883
DiedAugust 10, 1951(1951-08-10) (aged 67)
NationalityItalian
Title A.S.C. President (1924–1925)
Board member ofA.S.C.
SpouseRosina Gaudio
ChildrenFrancesco "Frank" Gaudio, Tony Gaudio, Elena Gaudio Hipple, Vera Gaudio Woods.
Relatives Eugene Gaudio (brother)
Awards1936 Academy Award for Best Cinematography

Tony Gaudio, A.S.C. (20 November 1883 10 August 1951) was an Italian-American cinematographer and sometimes is cited as the first to have created a montage sequence for a film.

Contents

Biography

Born Gaetano Antonio Gaudio in Cosenza, Italy, he began his career shooting short subjects for Italian film companies. He moved to New York City in 1906 and worked in Vitagraph's film laboratory until 1909, when he began shooting shorts for the company. His credits include Hell's Angels (1930), Little Caesar (1931), The Lady Who Dared (1931), Tiger Shark (1932), Anthony Adverse (1936), The Story of Louis Pasteur (1936), The Life of Emile Zola (1937), God's Country and the Woman (Warner Brothers' first Three-strip Technicolor film, (1937), The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), Juarez (1939), The Letter (1940), High Sierra (1941), Corvette K-225 (1943), Days of Glory (1944), A Song to Remember (1945), and The Red Pony (1949).

Gaudio was a favorite of Bette Davis and worked on 11 of her films, including Ex-Lady , Fog Over Frisco , Front Page Woman , Bordertown , The Sisters , Juarez , The Letter , and The Great Lie .

Gaudio won the Academy Award for Best Cinematography for Anthony Adverse and was nominated five additional times, for Hell's Angels, Juarez , The Letter , Corvette K-225 , and A Song to Remember . He was among the founders of the American Society of Cinematographers.

He died in 1951 and is interred in the Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Hollywood, California. His brother Eugene Gaudio, also a cinematographer, died in 1920 at the age of 34.

Selected filmography

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">George Barnes (cinematographer)</span> American cinematographer

George S. Barnes, A.S.C. was an American cinematographer active from the era of silent films to the early 1950s.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Charles K. French</span> American actor (1860–1952)

Charles K. French was an American film actor, screenwriter and director who appeared in more than 240 films between 1909 and 1945.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Joseph Ruttenberg</span> American cinematographer

Joseph Ruttenberg, A.S.C. was a Ukrainian-born American photojournalist and cinematographer.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Arthur Edeson</span> American cinematographer (1891–1970)

Arthur Edeson, A.S.C. was a film cinematographer, born in New York City. His career ran from the formative years of the film industry in New York, through the silent era in Hollywood, and the sound era there in the 1930s and 1940s. His work included many landmarks in film history, including The Thief of Bagdad (1924), All Quiet on the Western Front (1930), Frankenstein (1931), The Maltese Falcon (1941), and Casablanca (1942).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Karl Freund</span> German film director and cinematographer

Karl W. Freund, A.S.C. was a German Bohemian and American cinematographer and film director. He is best known for photographing Metropolis (1927), Dracula (1931), and television's I Love Lucy (1951–1957). Freund was an innovator in the field of cinematography, often noted for pioneering the unchained camera technique.

George Joseph Folsey, A.S.C., was an American cinematographer who worked on 162 films from 1919 to his retirement in 1976.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Arthur Miller (cinematographer)</span> American cinematographer (1895–1970)

Arthur Charles Miller, A.S.C. was an American cinematographer. He was nominated for the Oscar for Best Cinematography six times, winning three times: for How Green Was My Valley in 1941, The Song of Bernadette in 1944, and Anna and the King of Siam in 1947.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Montagu Love</span> English actor (1877–1943)

Montagu Love was an English screen, stage and vaudeville actor.

David Abel was a cinematographer.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Holmes Herbert</span> English-American actor (1882–1956)

Holmes Herbert was an English character actor who appeared in Hollywood films from 1915 to 1952, often as a British gentleman.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Harry O. Hoyt</span> American screenwriter, film director

Harry O. Hoyt was an American screenwriter and film director whose film career began in 1912, during the silent era. He graduated with a degree in literature from Yale University in 1910. His 1925 film The Lost World, based on the book by Arthur Conan Doyle, is notable as a pioneering effort in the use of stop-motion animation. His brother, actor Arthur Hoyt, also appeared in The Lost World.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Phil Rosen</span> American film director (1888-1951)

Philip E. Rosen was an American film director and cinematographer. He directed more than 140 films between 1915 and 1949.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Paul Bildt</span> German actor (1885–1957)

Paul Hermann Bildt was a German film actor. He appeared in more than 180 films between 1910 and 1956. He was born in Berlin and died in Zehlendorf, West Berlin.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Anton Grot</span> Polish art director

Anton Grot was a Polish art director long active in Hollywood. He was known for his prolific output with Warner Brothers, contributing, in such films as Little Caesar (1931), and Gold Diggers of 1933 to the distinctive Warners look. According to a TCM profile, he showed a "flair for harsh realism, Expressionistic horror and ornate romantic moods alike".

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Stewart Rome</span> English actor

Stewart Rome was an English actor who appeared in more than 150 films between 1913 and 1950.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Rudolf Biebrach</span> German actor and director

Rudolf Biebrach was a German actor and film director. He directed over 70 films between 1909 and 1930; and he appeared as an actor in nearly 110 films between 1909 and 1938. In his youth, Biebrach had worked for some years as an engraver. He got his first engagement as an actor in Gießen during 1890/1891. After a long career as a stage actor, Biebrach managed to become a successful director and character actor in the German film during the 1910s. He directed many films with Henny Porten and Lotte Neumann.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Curt Courant</span> German cinematographer

Curt Courant was a German cinematographer who worked on over a hundred films during the silent and early sound eras. Courant worked in several European countries, collaborating with figures such as Alfred Hitchcock and Fritz Lang. As he was of Jewish ancestry, Courant was forced to leave Germany in 1933 and go into exile following the Nazi takeover of power. Courant worked at several of the leading British studios during the mid-1930s. He is the uncle of Willy Kurant who also became a cinematographer.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">René Guissart (director)</span>

René Guissart was a French film director and cinematographer. During the 1920s and 1930s he worked as cinematographer on many British films many of them for British International Pictures. He also worked on MGM's 1925 epic Ben-Hur. From 1931 Guissart began directing and had made twenty eight films by 1939.

Harry Perry was an American cinematographer who was nominated for an Academy Award at the 3rd Academy Awards for Best Cinematography for the film Hell's Angels along with Tony Gaudio. He lived to be 96 years old.

Allen G. Siegler was an American cinematographer who lensed nearly 200 films and television episodes between 1914 and 1952. He worked at Columbia Pictures for many years, and was an early member of the American Society of Cinematographers.