Tony Hinkle

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Tony Hinkle
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Biographical details
Born(1899-12-19)December 19, 1899
Logansport, Indiana
DiedSeptember 22, 1992(1992-09-22) (aged 92)
Indianapolis, Indiana
Playing career
Football
1918–1921 Chicago
Basketball
1918–1921 Chicago
Baseball
1918–1921 Chicago
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1926 Butler
1935–1941Butler
1942–1943 Great Lakes Navy
1946–1969Butler
Basketball
1926–1942 Butler
1945–1970Butler
Baseball
1921–1928 Butler
1933–1941Butler
1946–1970Butler
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1926–1927 Butler
1931–1942 Butler
1945–1970 Butler
Head coaching record
Overall183–104–16 (football)
560–392 (basketball)
335–309–3 (baseball)
TournamentsBasketball
2–1 (NCAA University Division)
1–2 (NIT)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
8 IIC (1935–1940, 1946–1947)
9 ICC (1952, 1953, 1958–1964)

Basketball
2 MVC regular season (1933–1934)
MAC regular season (1947)
7 ICC regular season (1952–1954, 1959, 1961, 1962, 1970)
Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1965 (profile)
College Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2006

Paul D. "Tony" Hinkle (December 19, 1899 – September 22, 1992) was an American football, basketball, and baseball player, coach, and college athletic administrator. He attended the University of Chicago, where he won varsity letters in three sports. Hinkle captained the Chicago Maroons basketball team for two seasons was twice selected as an All-American, in 1919 and 1920. After graduating from the University of Chicago, Hinkle moved on to Butler University as a coach. There, over the course of nearly 50 years, he served as the head football coach (1926, 1935–1941, 1946–1969), head basketball coach (1926–1942, 1945–1970), and head baseball coach (1921–1928, 1933–1941, 1946–1970). Hinkle was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as a contributor in 1965. Butler's home basketball arena was renamed as Hinkle Fieldhouse in the coach's honor in 1966.

Contents

Early life and playing career

Hinkle was born in Logansport, Indiana, to Edgar Clayton and Winnie (Ray) Hinkle. He graduated in 1917 from Calumet High School in Chicago, Illinois, and attended the University of Chicago from 1917 to 1921. As a player at Chicago, he lettered three times in basketball, was twice All-Big Ten, twice team captain, named to the Helms All-America team in 1919 and 1920, was a member of the Big Ten Conference championship team in 1919–20, losing the national championship to Penn.

Coaching career

Hinkle joined Butler University in 1921 when they were still at the Irvington campus; the university bought Fairview Park in 1922 and moved the campus there in 1928. At Butler, Hinkle served as a teacher, coach and athletic administrator for nearly half a century. While he coached football, basketball, and baseball, he was primarily known as a basketball coach. His teams were fearless, gaining a reputation as "Big Ten killers". In 1929, the Butler Bulldogs basketball team he led to a 17–2 record was crowned national champion; in 1924, he had been assistant coach when they received similar honors. Overall, his basketball teams scored 560 victories versus 392 defeats, and he scored more than 1,000 victories in all sports.

Hinkle was instrumental in ending the rule providing for a jump ball after every basket, and in the introduction of the three-second rule.

Basketballs were generally brown until Hinkle introduced the orange basketball in the late 1950s. He also came up with the "Hinkle System" offense strategy, based on a complex system of motion, passes, picks and screens; it was adopted by many of the over 200 high school and college coaches trained by Hinkle.

Hinkle was president of the National Association of Basketball Coaches from 1954 to 1955, and served on their board. He won the NABC's top award in 1962 for contributions to the betterment of the game of basketball. He was named Chairman of the Rules Committee of the National Basketball Committee of the U.S. and Canada. Hinkle was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1965, the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame in 1964, and the Indiana Football Hall of Fame in 1974.

Hinkle's legacy is remembered on the Butler campus with Hinkle Fieldhouse, longtime site of Indiana's state high school championships and featured in the film Hoosiers . The fieldhouse, originally named Butler Fieldhouse, was the largest basketball arena in the United States for decades. It was renamed as Hinkle Fieldhouse in 1966. Hinkle coached 41 seasons of basketball at Butler, ending in 1970, and remained with Butler University until his death in 1992.

Hinkle is buried alongside his wife, Jane Murdock Stewart Hinkle (1907–1959) at Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis.

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffsAP#
Butler Bulldogs (Independent)(1926)
1926 Butler3–6
Butler Bulldogs (Indiana Intercollegiate Conference)(1935–1941)
1935 Butler7–16–01st
1936 Butler6–0–25–01st
1937 Butler5–2–13–0–11st
1938 Butler4–43–01st
1939 Butler7–0–14–01st
1940 Butler4–4–14–0T–1st
1941 Butler5–43–1T–3rd
Great Lakes Navy Bluejackets (Independent)(1942–1943)
1942 Great Lakes Navy 8–3–1
1943 Great Lakes Navy 10–26
Great Lakes Navy:18–5–3
Butler Bulldogs (Indiana Intercollegiate Conference)(1946)
1946 Butler7–16–01st
Butler Bulldogs (Indiana Intercollegiate Conference / Mid-American Conference)(1947)
1947 Butler 5–3–1/ 1–31st / T–3rd
Butler Bulldogs (Mid-American Conference)(1948–1949)
1948 Butler3–50–46th
1949 Butler2–60–36th
Butler Bulldogs (Independent)(1950)
1950 Butler4–4–1
Butler Bulldogs (Indiana Collegiate Conference)(1951–1969)
1951 Butler4–4–13–23rd
1952 Butler5–3–13–1–1T–1st
1953 Butler6–25–01st
1954 Butler4–4–13–24th
1955 Butler3–53–34th
1956 Butler6–25–12nd
1957 Butler7–25–12nd
1958 Butler8–15–11st
1959 Butler9–06–01st
1960 Butler8–15–11st
1961 Butler9–06–01st
1962 Butler5–2–24–1–11st
1963 Butler8–16–01st
1964 Butler4–4–14–2T–1st
1965 Butler6–34–22nd
1966 Butler4–54–2T–2nd
1967 Butler2–71–5T–6th
1968 Butler2–71–34th
1969 Butler3–62–23rd
Butler:183–104–16
Total:183–104–16
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

Basketball

Statistics overview
SeasonTeamOverallConferenceStandingPostseason
Butler Bulldogs (Independent)(1926–1932)
1926–27Butler17–4
1927–28Butler19–3
1928–29Butler17–2John J. McDevitt
National Championship Trophy
(Veteran Athletes of Philadelphia) [1]
1929–30Butler12–8
1930–31Butler17–2
1931–32Butler14–5
Butler Bulldogs (Missouri Valley Conference)(1932–1934)
1932–33Butler16–59–11st
1933–34Butler14–79–11st
Butler Bulldogs (Independent)(1934–1942)
1934–35Butler13–7
1935–36Butler6–15
1936–37Butler6–15
1937–38Butler11–12
1938–39Butler14–6
1939–40Butler17–6
1940–41Butler13–9
1941–42Butler13–9
Butler Bulldogs (Independent)(1945–1946)
1945–46Butler12–8
Butler Bulldogs (Mid-American Conference [2] )(1946–1950)
1946–47Butler16–74–11st
1947–48Butler14–74–22nd
1948–49Butler18–58–22nd
1949–50Butler12–126–43rd
Butler Bulldogs (Indiana Collegiate Conference)(1950–1970)
1950–51Butler5–193–9
1951–52 Butler12–1210–21st
1952–53Butler14–99–31st
1953–54Butler13–127–41st
1954–55Butler10–148–4
1955–56 Butler14–98–4
1956–57 Butler11–146–6
1957–58 Butler16–1010–2 NIT First Round
1958–59Butler19–910–21st NIT Quarterfinal
1959–60Butler15–1110–2
1960–61Butler15–1110–21st
1961–62Butler22–610–21st NCAA University Division Regional Third Place
1962–63Butler16–1010–2
1963–64Butler13–139–3
1964–65Butler11–155–7
1965–66Butler16–108–4
1966–67Butler9–175–7
1967–68Butler11–146–6
1968–69Butler11–154–4
1969–70Butler15–116–21st
Butler:560–392 (.588)248–88 (.738)
Total:560–392 (.588)

      National champion        Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion        Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion      Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

See also

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