Tony Hoar

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Tony Hoar
Tony Hoar (1955).jpg
Tony Hoar (1955)
Personal information
Full nameTony Hoar
Born(1932-02-10)10 February 1932
Emsworth, Hampshire, England
Died5 October 2019(2019-10-05) (aged 87)
Team information
DisciplineRoad
RoleRider
Professional team(s)
1955Hercules Cycles
1956Cilo - Saint-Raphaël

Tony Hoar (10 February 1932 5 October 2019) was a British racing cyclist. [1] [2] He represented England in the road race at the 1954 British Empire and Commonwealth Games in Vancouver, Canada. [3] [4]

England at the 1954 British Empire and Commonwealth Games

England competed at the 1954 British Empire and Commonwealth Games in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, from 30 July to 7 August 1954.

The 1954 British Empire and Commonwealth Games were held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, from 30 July to 7 August 1954. These were the first games since the name change from British Empire Games took effect in 1952.

Vancouver City in British Columbia, Canada

Vancouver is a coastal seaport city in western Canada, located in the Lower Mainland region of British Columbia. As the most populous city in the province, the 2016 census recorded 631,486 people in the city, up from 603,502 in 2011. The Greater Vancouver area had a population of 2,463,431 in 2016, making it the third-largest metropolitan area in Canada. Vancouver has the highest population density in Canada, with over 5,400 people per square kilometre, which makes it the fifth-most densely populated city with over 250,000 residents in North America, behind New York City, Guadalajara, San Francisco, and Mexico City according to the 2011 census. Vancouver is one of the most ethnically and linguistically diverse cities in Canada according to that census; 52% of its residents have a first language other than English. 48.9% have neither English nor French as their first language. Approximately 30% of the city's inhabitants are of Chinese heritage.

He gained selection for the Tour de France, where he finished in last place in the 1955 Tour de France. [5]

The lanterne rouge is the competitor in last place in a cycling race such as the Tour de France. The phrase comes from the French for "Red Lantern" and refers to the red lantern hung on the rear vehicle of a passenger railway train or the brake van of a freight train, which signalmen would look for in order to make sure none of the couplings had become disconnected.

1955 Tour de France cycling race

The 1955 Tour de France was the 42nd edition of the Tour de France, taking place from 7 to 30 July. It consisted of 22 stages over 4,495 km (2,793 mi). The race was won by Louison Bobet, the last of his three consecutive wins.

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References

  1. "Tour de France cult figure, inventor Tony Hoar dies at 87". Times Colonist. Retrieved 10 October 2019.
  2. "Tony Hoar". Cycling Archives. Retrieved 22 April 2014.
  3. "Athletes and results". Commonwealth Games Federation.
  4. "1954 Athletes". Team England.
  5. "Tony Hoar". ProCyclingStats. Retrieved 22 April 2014.