Tony Kappen

Last updated
Tony Kappen
Personal information
Born(1919-04-13)April 13, 1919
DiedDecember 18, 1993(1993-12-18) (aged 79)
NationalityAmerican
Listed height5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Listed weight165 lb (75 kg)
Career information
High school Forest Hills
(Queens, New York)
Position Guard
Number5
Career history
1936–1937 Jersey Reds
1938–1939Brooklyn Visitation
1939–1940Baltimore Clippers
1940–1942 New York Jewels
1945–1946New York Gothams
1946 Boston Celtics
1946–1947 Pittsburgh Ironmen
1948–1949 Troy Celtics
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Anthony George Kappen (April 13, 1919 December 18, 1993) was an American professional basketball player.

Contents

A 5'10" guard who did not attend college and had previously attended Forest Hills High School in Queens, Kappen played for the Boston Celtics and the Pittsburgh Ironmen during the 1946–47 BAA season. He averaged 6.5 points per game during the season on 23.8% shooting. Kappen and Celtics teammate Connie Simmons were the first players in the BAA (later known as the NBA) who did not have any college experience. [1] [2] Kappen had previously played in the American Basketball League [3] for the New York Gothams and Brooklyn Gothams. [4]

Celtics PR director Howie McHugh said that Kappen "was one of the few guys [on the 194647 Celtics] who were serious about playing". However, Kappen was traded midseason to the Pittsburgh Ironmen for Moe Becker, who had become available after a falling-out with his coach. [5]

BAA career statistics

Legend
  GPGames played FG%  Field-goal percentage
 FT%  Free-throw percentage APG  Assists per game
 PPG Points per game Bold Career high

Regular season

YearTeamGPFG%FT%APGPPG
1946–47 Boston 18.275.632.34.1
1946–47 Pittsburgh 41.231.856.57.6
Career59.238.795.56.5

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References

  1. Tony Kappen. basketball-reference. Retrieved on January 12, 2009.
  2. High school players to enter NBA. Retrieved on January 12, 2009.
  3. Michael Weinreb. "Telfair's quantum leap of faith". The Daily Press. May 5, 2004. Retrieved on January 12, 2009.
  4. American Basketball League Statistics. APBR.org. Retrieved on January 12, 2009.
  5. Charley Rosen. The First Tip-Off. McGraw-Hill, 2008. 87-88.