Tony Kaufmann

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Tony Kaufmann on Catalina Island during his time with the Cubs Tony Kaufmann1.jpg
Tony Kaufmann on Catalina Island during his time with the Cubs
Tony Kaufmann
Pitcher/Outfielder
Born:(1900-12-16)December 16, 1900
Chicago
Died: June 4, 1982(1982-06-04) (aged 81)
Elgin, Illinois
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
September 23, 1921, for the Chicago Cubs
Last MLB appearance
September 23, 1935, for the St. Louis Cardinals
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 64–62
Earned run average 4.18
Innings pitched 1,086 13
Batting average .220
Home runs 9
Runs batted in 57
Teams

Anthony Charles Kaufmann (December 16, 1900 – June 4, 1982) was an American professional baseball player, coach and manager. He played in 260 Major League games, primarily as a pitcher, for the Chicago Cubs (1921–27), Philadelphia Phillies (1927), St. Louis Cardinals (1927–28, 1930–31 and 1935) and New York Giants (1929). The native of Chicago stood 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and weighed 165 pounds (75 kg).

Kaufmann led the National League in hit batsmen (11) in 1923 and home runs allowed (21) in 1924.

In 11 seasons and 202 games pitched, he had a 64–62 record, with 123 starts, 71 complete games, nine shutouts, 12 saves, 1,086 13 innings pitched, 1,198 hits allowed, 587 runs allowed, 81 home runs allowed, 368 walks, 345 strikeouts, 39 hit batsmen, 15 wild pitches and a 4.18 earned run average. As a competent hitting pitcher, Kaufmann also played 18 games in the outfield during his late-career stints with the Phillies, Giants and Cardinals. In 414 Major League at bats, he collected 91 hits, with 19 doubles and nine home runs, for a batting average of .220.

After his active career, Kaufmann managed in the Cardinals' farm system (1938–42), and scouted (1943–46) and coached (1947–50) for the MLB Redbirds. He died in Elgin, Illinois, at the age of 81.

See also


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