Tony Marino (boxer)

Last updated
Tony Marino
Tony.Marino.jpeg
Statistics
Real nameAnthony Marino
Weight(s) Bantamweight
Height5 ft 2 in (1.57 m)
Nationality Flag of the United States.svg American
Born(1910-05-18)May 18, 1910
Duquesne, Pennsylvania
DiedFebruary 1, 1937(1937-02-01) (aged 26)
Brooklyn, New York
Stance Orthodox
Boxing record
Total fights44
Wins28
Wins by KO7
Losses14
Draws2

Tony Marino (May 18, 1910 – February 1, 1937) was an American boxer who became the World Bantamweight Champion on June 29, 1936 when he defeated Baltasar Sangchili in a fourteenth-round knockout in New York. [1] [2] [3] Marino had the famous trainer Ray Arcel and managers Reed Brown and Bill Newman. He died on February 1, 1937 of injuries he received from his bout with boxer Carlos Quintana, two days earlier in Brooklyn. On February 3, 1937, the New York State Athletic Commission, citing Marino's death, created the three-knockdown rule, which is now universal in the sport of boxing. [4]

Contents

Early life and career

Tony Marino was born into a large and close Italian family on May 18, 1910 in Duquesne, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Pittsburgh. Most sources list his birth year as 1912, but his headstone lists it as 1910. Since his brother, Ralph Marino, was born in September 1912, it would not be possible for Tony Marino to have been born in May of that year. [5] His parents, Anthony and Mary, would eventually have ten children, giving Tony a total of six sisters and three brothers. His older brother Charles would take the ringname Tommy Ryan, and become an accomplished boxer himself, competing for the World Bantamweight Title in 1924. [2]

Tony was named after his father, who eventually settled the family on South Fifth Street in Duquesne. [6] Marino was known as a studied boxer, not a strong puncher, though he had a good left hand, and a short, but accomplished career.

According to one source, Marino fought as many as eighty bouts before becoming a professional, though many were as short as three rounds. [7] As an amateur, Marino represented Pittsburgh at the National tournament in Boston with teammate, Ted Yarosz, also a Pittsburgh area native. Yarosz would take the 1934 NYSAC Middleweight Championship. [8]

He fought his first well publicized professional bout at the age of eighteen on July 2, 1930 winning in six rounds against Young Ketchell in North Braddock, Pennsylvania. [3] He beat Ketchell again on May 20, 1932 in an eight-round Unanimous Decision at Stanton Park Arena in Steubenville, Ohio.

On March 14, 1932 he decisively defeated Joey Ross in an eight-round Split Decision at Motor Square Garden in Pittsburgh. Marino carried much of the fight with terrific combinations of rights and left hooks, but Ross finished strong, and won the last round, when Marino may have begun to fatigue. At least one reporter at ringside felt Marino had won all but the sixth and eighth rounds. [9]

On January 21, 1932 he defeated Marty Gold at the Palisades Rink in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, in a ten-round points decision. As one of his earliest bouts with a more experienced boxer, the Pittsburgh Post, wrote that Marino had "met his hardest test, ...and survived it." He won the important and well publicized match by a unanimous decision of the judges. [10] Marino staggered Gold with a left hook in the sixth, but was warned for low blows in the early rounds. In what was not entirely a one-sided bout, Gold knocked Marino to a sitting posture in the last round though some at ringside considered it one of Gold's few solidly landed blows. [11]

First bout with Midget Wolgast

He fought Midget Wolgast for the first time on June 6, 1932, at the Myers Bowl in North Braddock, Pennsylvania, losing in a ten-round points decision. Wolgast had been the NYSAC World Flyweight Boxing Champion in 1930. [2]

On October 25 and November 12, 1934, he lost to Filipino boxer Small Montana in ten round points decisions in Sacramento and San Francisco, California. A worthy opponent, in 1935, Montana would take the NYSAC World Flyweight Championship. [2]

On April 11, 1936, he received his first of only two knockouts in his career from Willie Felice at Ridgewood Grove in Brooklyn, New York. The knockout occurred in the third round. [2] On May 2, 1936, he showed he could avenge a dominating opponent, winning in a six-round points decision at Ridgewood Grove in New York. New York's Democrat and Chronicle considered the win "impressive". [12]

Though weighing in six pounds lighter, on March 28, 1936 at Ridgewood Grove in Brooklyn, he defeated Johnny "Skippy" Allen in an impressive fourth-round technical knockout. [13]

Win against Lou Salica

On June 2, 1936, he defeated Lou Salica, former NYSAC World Bantamweight Title Holder, in Queensboro Arena in New York. He surprised the crowd with an unexpected ten round points decision against the former champion. [14] It was a victory that helped Marino rise to greater prominence. [15]

World Bantam Champion

Marino became the World Bantamweight champion on June 29, 1936 when he defeated Spanish boxer Baltasar Sangchili in a close and stunning fourteenth-round knockout in New York. [3] Marino had been down four times in the bout and was well behind in points. In the fourteenth round Marino shot a jarring short left hook to the chin of Sangchili who thought he was close to finishing off Marino. After landing the surprise left, Marino "rammed a right to the body (of Sangchili) and then shifted his attack to the head, hooking a series of punches with both hands. Sangchili crumpled until he fell over on his face to be counted out." [16] Many in the audience were stunned by the upset, and considered Marino a relative unknown who had fought several previous fights for as little as $40.

Marino boxed Sangchili a second time, after his loss of the Bantamweight Championship on October 15, 1936, at Motor Square Garden near his birthplace of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He lost the ten round points decision.

Loss of Bantam title

Only two months after taking the title, he lost it on August 31, 1936, in a thirteenth round Technical Knockout to Puerto Rican NYSAC World Bantamweight champion Sixto Escobar at Dyckman Oval in Manhattan, New York. As early as the second round, Escobar floored Marino five times for counts of three, eight, four, seven, and five. Finally, the ring physician ordered the bout halted in the thirteenth round because of facial cuts on Marino, particularly a nasty cut over his right eye which bled continuously since the fifth round. His left eye had swelling and a cut above it as well.

Marino, going out in championship style, never ceased to cautiously continue the fight before the enthusiastic crowd of 8,500, though unable to score more than a draw in any of the rounds. Escobar had a swollen lip and swelling on the left side of his face, but weathered the bout in far better shape than his opponent. [17]

On October 31, 1936 he defeated the accomplished Nicky Jerome in an eight-round points decision in Brooklyn, New York. In one of his last fights, On December 19, 1936, he defeated Jerome again in an eight-round points decision at Ridgewood Grove in Brooklyn. One newspaper noted that "his superior boxing gave him the edge", rather than strong punching. [18]

Last fight and resulting death

On January 30, 1937, Marino fought Panamanian boxer Carlos "Indian" Quintana at the Ridgewood Grove Arena in Brooklyn, New York. He took a terrific beating and was floored five times. The bout went the scheduled distance of eight rounds. Marino collapsed in the center of the ring just as the referee raised Quintana's hand to indicate his victory. He was examined by the ringside doctor, Eugene Kenny, who diagnosed a brain concussion. He was carried to his dressing room. Shortly thereafter, he was rushed to Wyckoff Heights Hospital in Brooklyn. He never regained consciousness and died on February 1, two days after the fight. [2] [19] A benefit for his family was held in his honor in New York partly through the efforts of John Attell, a matchmaker who had arranged several of his fights; it netted a total of $1,212.74. [20] Quintana headlined the card of fighters. [21]

Death inspires boxing rule

Two days after he died, the New York State Athletic Commission convened to frame a new rule. Citing Marino's death, they determined that any fighter knocked down three times in a single round would be considered "outclassed" and the fight would be stopped. At the time of its creation, this rule did not apply to championship matches. [22] Over the years, the three-knockdown rule spread beyond the boundaries of New York, being used in many states and other countries. [23]

Professional boxing record

Professional record summary
44 fights28 wins14 losses
By knockout72
By decision2112
Draws2
No.ResultRecordOpponentTypeRoundDateLocationNotes
44Loss28–14–2 Flag of Panama.svg Indian QuintanaPTS8Jan 30, 1937 Flag of the United States.svg Ridgewood Grove, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, U.S.
43Win28–13–2 Flag of the United States.svg Nicky JeromePTS8Dec 19, 1936 Flag of the United States.svg Ridgewood Grove, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, U.S.
42Win27–13–2 Flag of Puerto Rico.svg Cristobal JaramilloPTS8Dec 09, 1936 Flag of the United States.svg Hippodrome, New York City, New York, U.S.
41Win26–13–2 Flag of the United States.svg Jimmy MartinPTS8Nov 21, 1936 Flag of the United States.svg Ridgewood Grove, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, U.S.
40Win25–13–2 Flag of the United States.svg Nicky JeromePTS8Oct 31, 1936 Flag of the United States.svg Ridgewood Grove, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, U.S.
39Loss24–13–2 Flag of Spain 1931 1939.svg Baltasar Sangchili PTS10Oct 15, 1936 Flag of the United States.svg Motor Square Garden, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
38Loss24–12–2 Flag of Puerto Rico.svg Sixto Escobar TKO13 (15)Aug 31, 1936 Flag of the United States.svg Dyckman Oval, Manhattan, New York City, New York, U.S.Lost The Ring bantamweight title
For NBA and NYSAC bantamweight titles
37Win24–11–2 Flag of Spain 1931 1939.svg Baltasar Sangchili KO14 (15)Jun 29, 1936 Flag of the United States.svg Dyckman Oval, Manhattan, New York City, New York, U.S.Won The Ring bantamweight title
36Win23–11–2 Flag of the United States.svg Lou Salica PTS10Jun 02, 1936 Flag of the United States.svg Queensboro Arena, Long Island City, Queens, New York City, New York, U.S.
35Win22–11–2 Flag of the United States.svg Santos HugoTKO4 (6)May 16, 1936 Flag of the United States.svg Ridgewood Grove, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, U.S.
34Win21–11–2 Flag of the United States.svg Willie FelicePTS6May 02, 1936 Flag of the United States.svg Ridgewood Grove, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, U.S.
33Loss20–11–2 Flag of the United States.svg Willie FeliceKO3 (6)Apr 11, 1936 Flag of the United States.svg Ridgewood Grove, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, U.S.
32Win20–10–2 Flag of the United States.svg Skippy AllenTKO4 (6)Mar 28, 1936 Flag of the United States.svg Ridgewood Grove, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, U.S.
31Win19–10–2 Flag of the United States.svg Richard LiBrandiPTS6Mar 14, 1936 Flag of the United States.svg Ridgewood Grove, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, U.S.
30Draw18–10–2 Flag of the Philippines.svg Speedy Dado PTS10Oct 22, 1935 Flag of the United States.svg Memorial Auditorium, Sacramento, California, U.S.
29Loss18–10–1 Flag of the United States.svg Midget Wolgast PTS10Oct 02, 1935 Flag of the United States.svg Auditorium, Oakland, California, U.S.
28Win18–9–1 Flag of the Philippines.svg General PadillaPTS8Aug 05, 1935 Flag of the United States.svg Civic Auditorium, San Francisco, California, U.S.
27Loss17–9–1 Flag of the Philippines.svg Young Tommy PTS10Jul 12, 1935 Flag of the United States.svg Legion Stadium, Hollywood, California, U.S.
26Loss17–8–1 Flag of the Philippines.svg Pablo DanoPTS10Apr 11, 1935 Flag of the United States.svg Memorial Auditorium, Sacramento, California, U.S.
25Win17–7–1 Flag of the United States.svg Joey DodgePTS10Mar 15, 1935 Flag of the United States.svg Memorial Auditorium, Sacramento, California, U.S.
24Loss16–7–1 Flag of the Philippines.svg Pablo DanoPTS10Dec 07, 1934 Flag of the United States.svg Watsonville, California, U.S.
23Loss16–6–1 Flag of the Philippines.svg Small Montana PTS10Nov 12, 1934 Flag of the United States.svg Civic Auditorium, San Francisco, California, U.S.
22Loss16–5–1 Flag of the Philippines.svg Small Montana PTS10Oct 25, 1934 Flag of the United States.svg L Street Arena, Sacramento, California, U.S.
21Win16–4–1 Flag of the Philippines.svg Ray MayoPTS8Sep 28, 1934 Flag of the United States.svg Dreamland Auditorium, San Francisco, California, U.S.
20Win15–4–1 Flag of the United States.svg Bobby OlivasTKO4 (10)Sep 07, 1934 Flag of the United States.svg Dreamland Auditorium, San Francisco, California, U.S.
19Draw14–4–1 Flag of the United States.svg Joey DodgePTS10Aug 10, 1934 Flag of the United States.svg Chestnut St. Arena, Reno, Nevada, U.S.
18Win14–4 Flag of the United States.svg Johnny PerrineUD10Jun 05, 1933 Flag of the United States.svg Hickey Park, Millvale, Pennsylvania, U.S.
17Loss13–4 Flag of the United States.svg Ernie MaurerPTS6Nov 03, 1932 Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg Maple Leaf Gardens, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
16Loss13–3 Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg Bobby LeithamPTS12Oct 10, 1932 Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg Maple Leaf Gardens, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
15Loss13–2 Flag of the United States.svg Midget Wolgast UD10Jun 06, 1932 Flag of the United States.svg Meyers Bowl, North Braddock, Pennsylvania, U.S.
14Win13–1 Flag of the United States.svg Young KetchellUD8May 20, 1932 Flag of the United States.svg Stanton Park Arena, Steubenville, Ohio, U.S.
13Loss12–1 Flag of the United States.svg Willie DaviesSD10Mar 31, 1932 Flag of the United States.svg Palisades Rink, McKeesport, Pennsylvania, U.S.
12Win12–0 Flag of the United States.svg Joey RossSD8Mar 14, 1932 Flag of the United States.svg Motor Square Garden, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
11Win11–0 Flag of the United States.svg Mickey FarrTKO3 (8)Feb 15, 1932 Flag of the United States.svg Motor Square Garden, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
10Win10–0 Flag of the United States.svg Franklyn YoungUD10Feb 11, 1932 Flag of the United States.svg Palisades Rink, McKeesport, Pennsylvania, U.S.
9Win9–0 Flag of the United States.svg Marty GoldUD10Jan 21, 1932 Flag of the United States.svg Palisades Rink, McKeesport, Pennsylvania, U.S.
8Win8–0 Flag of the Philippines.svg Frisco GrandePTS10Jan 07, 1932 Flag of the United States.svg Palisades Rink, McKeesport, Pennsylvania, U.S.
7Win7–0 Flag of the United States.svg Johnny EdwardsPTS10Dec 21, 1931 Flag of the United States.svg Wheeling, Pennsylvania, U.S.
6Win6–0 Flag of the United States.svg Tony SheaTKO4 (6)Nov 30, 1931 Flag of the United States.svg Motor Square Garden, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
5Win5–0 Flag of the United States.svg Cleo McNealTKO1 (6)Nov 12, 1931 Flag of the United States.svg Palisades Rink, McKeesport, Pennsylvania, U.S.
4Win4–0 Flag of the United States.svg George TomaskyPTS6Oct 15, 1931 Flag of the United States.svg Palisades Rink, McKeesport, Pennsylvania, U.S.
3Win3–0 Flag of the United States.svg Young KetchellPTS6Feb 26, 1931 Flag of the United States.svg Palisades Rink, McKeesport, Pennsylvania, U.S.
2Win2–0 Flag of the United States.svg George SotakUD6Jan 08, 1931 Flag of the United States.svg Palisades Rink, McKeesport, Pennsylvania, U.S.
1Win1–0 Flag of the United States.svg Young KetchellPTS6July 02, 1930 Flag of the United States.svg Meyers Bowl, North Braddock, Pennsylvania, U.S.

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References

  1. "The Lineal Bantamweight Champions". Cyber Boxing Zone.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Tony Marino". BoxRec. Retrieved 30 August 2016.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. 1 2 3 "Tony Marino". Cyber Boxing Zone. Retrieved 30 August 2016.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. "Knockdown Rule Urged", Sarasota Herald-Tribune, Sarasota, Florida, pg. 7, 4 February 1937
  5. "Ralph Marino". Find A Grave.
  6. "Tony Marino Dies in Bout That was to Be His Last", The Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pg. 1, 1 February 1937
  7. Fought as many as eighty amateur bouts in "Marino Faces Test in Fight Against Marty Gold Tonight", Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pg. 24, 21 January 1932
  8. Marino fought in Nationals as an amateur in "Marino Expects Tough Battle with Dodge", Reno Gazette-Journal, Reno, Nevada, pg. 9, 9 August 1934
  9. Marino won all but sixth and eighth in "Red Robinson Halts Bout in Third Round", The Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pg. 28, 15 March 1932
  10. "Marino Tops Gold in Tube City Bout", The Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pg. 34, 22 January 1932
  11. Gold knocked Marino down in the last round in "Marino Beats Marty Gold", Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pg. 14, 22 January 1932
  12. "Tony Marino Gets Nod Over Felice", Democrat and Chronicle, Rochester, New York, pg. 46, 3 May 1936
  13. "Feldman Gains Decision Over Joe Boscarino", The Indianapolis Star, Indianapolis, Indiana, pg. 18, 29 March 1936
  14. "Scores Unexpected Win" The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois, pg. 10, 3 June 1936
  15. The win over Salica was important in "Marino Starts Remaking Ring Rep At Grove", Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, New York, pg. 25, 30 October 1936
  16. Grayson, Harry, "Cinderella Man Likely To Win Bantam Championship", The Brownsville Herald, Brownsville, Texas, pg. 18, 15 July 1936
  17. Kirksey, George, "Puerto Rica Boxer Wins Bantam Toga", The Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pg. 26, 1 September 1936
  18. Won by boxing style in "Tony Marino Wins in New York Bout", The Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pg. 21, 20 December 1936
  19. "Tony Marino Dies of Ring Injuries", The Wilkes-Barre Record, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, pg. 16, 2 February 1937
  20. "1,212.74 Netted in Tony Marino Benefit", Williamsport Sun-Gazette, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, pg. 12, 25 February 1937
  21. "Quintana Wins Bout Benefiting Victim", The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Washington, pg. 10, 22 February 1937
  22. "New Knockdown Rule In New York",The Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pg. 27, 4 February 1937
  23. Sanserino, Michael, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 28 January 2010, "PG South: Champion Duquesne Boxer Died From Injuries in Fight 73 Years Ago" . Retrieved 31 August 2016.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
Achievements
Preceded by
Baltasar Sangchili
World Bantamweight Champion
June 29, 1936 - August 31, 1936
Succeeded by
Sixto Escobar
Status
Preceded by
Francisco Guilledo
Latest born world champion to die
February 1, 1937 January 21, 1945
Succeeded by
Victor Perez