Tony Mulvihill

Last updated

Tony Mulvihill
Senator for New South Wales
In office
1 July 1965 4 February 1983
Personal details
Born(1919-04-27)27 April 1919
North Ryde, New South Wales, Australia
Died 10 December 2000(2000-12-10) (aged 81)
Katoomba, New South Wales, Australia
Nationality Australian
Political party Australian Labor Party
Occupation Unionist, railway worker

James Anthony "Tony" Mulvihill (27 April 1919 10 December 2000) was an Australian politician. Born in Sydney, he was educated at Catholic schools before becoming a railways employee. He was an official with the Australian Railways Union and then served as Assistant Secretary of the New South Wales Labor Party from 1957 to 1965. In 1964, he was elected to the Australian Senate as a Labor Senator for New South Wales. He remained in the Senate until his retirement in 1983. Mulvihill died in 2000. [1]

Australia Country in Oceania

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania and numerous smaller islands. It is the largest country in Oceania and the world's sixth-largest country by total area. The neighbouring countries are Papua New Guinea, Indonesia and East Timor to the north; the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu to the north-east; and New Zealand to the south-east. The population of 25 million is highly urbanised and heavily concentrated on the eastern seaboard. Australia's capital is Canberra, and its largest city is Sydney. The country's other major metropolitan areas are Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide.

Sydney City in New South Wales, Australia

Sydney is the state capital of New South Wales and the most populous city in Australia and Oceania. Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds Port Jackson and extends about 70 km (43.5 mi) on its periphery towards the Blue Mountains to the west, Hawkesbury to the north, the Royal National Park to the south and Macarthur to the south-west. Sydney is made up of 658 suburbs, 40 local government areas and 15 contiguous regions. Residents of the city are known as "Sydneysiders". As of June 2017, Sydney's estimated metropolitan population was 5,131,326, and is home to approximately 65% of the state's population.

New South Wales State of Australia

New South Wales is a state on the east coast of Australia. It borders Queensland to the north, Victoria to the south, and South Australia to the west. Its coast borders the Tasman Sea to the east. The Australian Capital Territory is an enclave within the state. New South Wales' state capital is Sydney, which is also Australia's most populous city. In March 2018, the population of New South Wales was over 7.9 million, making it Australia's most populous state. Just under two-thirds of the state's population, 5.1 million, live in the Greater Sydney area. Inhabitants of New South Wales are referred to as New South Welshmen.

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References

  1. Carr, Adam (2008). "Australian Election Archive". Psephos, Adam Carr's Election Archive. Retrieved 2008-11-10.