Tony Pierce (baseball)

Last updated
Tony Pierce
Pitcher
Born:(1946-01-29)January 29, 1946
Brunswick, Georgia
Died: January 31, 2013(2013-01-31) (aged 67)
Columbus, Georgia
Batted: RightThrew: Left
MLB debut
April 14, 1967, for the Kansas City Athletics
Last MLB appearance
June 21, 1968, for the Oakland Athletics
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 4–6
Earned run average 3.25
Innings 130⅓
Teams

Tony Michael Pierce (January 29, 1946 – January 31, 2013 [1] ) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher. He played for the Kansas City/Oakland Athletics in 19671968. A left-hander, he stood 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) tall and weighed 190 pounds (86 kg). In two Major League seasons, he appeared in 66 games played, nine as a starting pitcher, and 130⅓ innings pitched, allowing 118 hits and 40 bases on balls, with 77 strikeouts.

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