Tony Rosenthal

Last updated
Tony Rosenthal
Born
Bernard Rosenthal

(1914-08-09)August 9, 1914
DiedJuly 28, 2009(2009-07-28) (aged 94)
Nationality American
Education University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Known forAmerican abstract sculptor.
MovementPublic art sculptor
Tony Rosenthal's Alamo The Astor Place Cube (48072759542).jpg
Tony Rosenthal's Alamo

Bernard J. Rosenthal (August 9, 1914 - July 28, 2009), [1] also known as Tony Rosenthal, was an American abstract sculptor best known for creating monumental public art sculptures for over seven decades. [2]

Contents

Biography

Tony Rosenthal was born August 9, 1914 in Highland Park, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. [3] [4]

Career

Tony Rosenthal received his first public art commission when he created "A Nubian Slave" for the Elgin Watch Company building at the 1939 World's Fair. [5]

Although Rosenthal's public art, including his five works of public art in Manhattan, and dozens of similar works in Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Florida, Michigan, Connecticut and other cities, provided Rosenthal a vast audience every week, his sculptures are more famous than the artist. Art dealer Joseph K. Levene told The New York Times He reminds me of a character actor. You know the face but not the name. With him, you know the art. [6]

When he passed away at the age of 94, there was one honor that eluded Rosenthal who was a hard-working artist right up until his death. Although Rosenthal had a successful career creating public art for six decades, he never had a retrospective, but that’s all right, he has one every day on the streets of New York art dealer Joseph K. Levene told The New York Times when interviewed for Rosenthal's obituary. [7]

Sculpture created by Tony Rosenthal is owned by museum collections around the world, including: Chrysler Museum: "Big Six", 1977; Connecticut College: "Memorial Cube", 1972; Israel Museum: "Oracle", 1960; Long House Reserve: "Mandala", 1994-95, "Rites of Spring", 1997; Los Angeles County Museum of Art: "Things Invisible to See", 1960, "Harp Player", 1950; Milwaukee Art Museum: "Big Six", 1977, "Maquette for Hammarskjold", 1977; National Gallery of Art: "Magpole", 1965; San Diego Museum of Art: "Odyssey", 1974; "Cumuli III", 1965 [8] Risd Museum.

Tony Rosenthal ''5 in 1'', 1973-74 at One Police Plaza
(c)Estate of Tony Rosenthal / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY 5 in 1 Sculpture - One Police Plaza (48126616572).jpg
Tony Rosenthal ’’5 in 1’’, 1973-74 at One Police Plaza
©Estate of Tony Rosenthal / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Public Art

Tony Rosenthal was best known for his large outdoor geometric abstract sculptures. Rosenthal's work includes:

Photograph of art collector Martin Margulies with Tony Rosenthal ''T-Square'' (1978) at Grove Isle, Miami, Florida (c) Estate of Tony Rosenthal / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY Mr M Margulies at Sculpture Garden Deck on Grove Isle.jpg
Photograph of art collector Martin Margulies with Tony Rosenthal ’’T-Square’’ (1978) at Grove Isle, Miami, Florida © Estate of Tony Rosenthal / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

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References

  1. Grimes, William, Tony Rosenthal, Sculptor of Public Art, Dies at 94, New York Times, July 31, 2009.
  2. "Tony Rosenthal Biography | Sculptor | Public Art Legend". www.tonyrosenthal.com. Retrieved 2019-11-03.
  3. Tony Rosenthal (New York, NY : Rizzoli, 2000.) ISBN   0-8478-2316-4 pp. 58-67
  4. American Abstract Expressionism of the 1950s An Illustrated Survey, (New York School Press, 2003.) ISBN   0-9677994-1-4. p.293
  5. Grimes, William (2009-07-31). "Tony Rosenthal, Sculptor of Public Art, Dies at 94 (Published 2009)". The New York Times. ISSN   0362-4331 . Retrieved 2020-11-08.
  6. Grimes, William (2009-07-31). "Tony Rosenthal, Sculptor of Public Art, Dies at 94 (Published 2009)". The New York Times. ISSN   0362-4331 . Retrieved 2020-11-08.
  7. Grimes, William (2009-07-31). "Tony Rosenthal, Sculptor of Public Art, Dies at 94 (Published 2009)". The New York Times. ISSN   0362-4331 . Retrieved 2020-11-08.
  8. "Cumuli III | RISD Museum". risdmuseum.org. Retrieved 2020-11-11.
  9. "Tony Rosenthal | Copyright | VAGA". www.tonyrosenthal.com. Retrieved 2020-11-09.
  10. Pacheco, Antonio (2018-08-10). "Former LAPD headquarters to be demolished after years of controversy". The Architect's Newspaper. Retrieved 2021-02-18.
  11. "Empire State Plaza Art Collection".
  12. Tony Rosenthal (New York, NY : Rizzoli, 2000.) ISBN   0-8478-2316-4 p.6
  13. American Abstract Expressionism of the 1950s An Illustrated Survey, (New York School Press, 2003.) ISBN   0-9677994-1-4. p.290