Tony Seymour

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Tony Seymour may refer to:

<i>Accused</i> (1936 film) 1936 film by Thornton Freeland

Accused is a 1936 British mystery film directed by Thornton Freeland and starring Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Dolores del Río and Florence Desmond. It was made at Isleworth Studios by the independent Criterion Films, which Fairbanks was a co-owner of. The film's sets were designed by Edward Carrick.

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Jane Seymour Third wife of Henry VIII of England

Jane Seymour was Queen of England from 1536 to 1537 as the third wife of King Henry VIII. She succeeded Anne Boleyn as queen consort following the latter's execution in May 1536. She died of postnatal complications less than two weeks after the birth of her only child, a son who became King Edward VI. She was the only one of Henry's wives to receive a queen's funeral, and his only consort to be buried beside him in St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

Jane Seymour (actress) English-American actress

Jane Seymour, OBE, is an English actress, best known for her performances in the James Bond film Live and Let Die (1973); Somewhere In Time (1980); East of Eden (1981); The Scarlet Pimpernel ; Onassis: The Richest Man in the World (1988); War and Remembrance (1988); the French epic La Révolution française (1989) as the ill-fated queen Marie Antoinette; Wedding Crashers (2005); and the American television series Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman (1993–1998), she has earned an Emmy Award, two Golden Globe Awards and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. In 2000, she was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire.

Catherine Parr Queen Consort of Henry VIII

Catherine Parr was Queen of England and Ireland (1543–47) as the last of the six wives of King Henry VIII, and the final queen consort of the House of Tudor. She married him on 12 July 1543, and outlived him by one year. With four husbands she is the most-married English queen.

Uriah Heep fictional character created by Charles Dickens in his novel David Copperfield

Uriah Heep is a fictional character created by Charles Dickens in his novel David Copperfield. Heep is one of the main antagonists of the novel. His character is notable for his cloying humility, obsequiousness, and insincerity, making frequent references to his own "'umbleness". His name has become synonymous with sycophancy.

<i>The Sopranos</i> American television series

The Sopranos is an American crime drama television series created by David Chase. The story revolves around Tony Soprano, a New Jersey-based Italian-American mobster, and portrays the difficulties that he faces as he tries to balance his family life with his role as the leader of a criminal organization. These are explored during his therapy sessions with psychiatrist Jennifer Melfi. The series features Tony's family members, mafia colleagues, and rivals in prominent roles—most notably his wife, Carmela, and his protégé/distant cousin, Christopher Moltisanti.

<i>Death of a Salesman</i> 1949 play by Arthur Miller

Death of a Salesman is a 1949 play written by American playwright Arthur Miller. It won the 1949 Pulitzer Prize for Drama and Tony Award for Best Play. The play premiered on Broadway in February 1949, running for 742 performances, and has been revived on Broadway four times, winning three Tony Awards for Best Revival. It is widely considered to be one of the greatest plays of the 20th century.

<i>The Pickwick Papers</i> monthly serial; first novel by Charles Dickens; published 1836–1837

The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club was Charles Dickens's first novel. He was asked to contribute to the project as an up-and-coming writer following the success of Sketches by Boz, published in 1836. Dickens increasingly took over the unsuccessful monthly publication after the original illustrator Robert Seymour had committed suicide.

<i>American Pastoral</i> 1997 Book by Philip Roth

American Pastoral is a Philip Roth novel published in 1997 concerning Seymour "Swede" Levov, a successful Jewish American businessman and former high school star athlete from Newark, New Jersey. Levov's happy and conventional upper middle class life is ruined by the domestic social and political turmoil of the 1960s during the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson, which in the novel is described as a manifestation of the "indigenous American berserk".

Philip Seymour Hoffman American actor and film director

Philip Seymour Hoffman was an American actor, director, and producer. Best known for his distinctive supporting and character roles – typically lowlifes, eccentrics, bullies, and misfits – Hoffman acted in many films from the early 1990s until his death in 2014.

Stephanie Seymour American model and actress

Stephanie Michelle Seymour is an American model and actress.

Willy Loman fictional character from Death of a Salesman

William "Willy" Loman is a fictional character and the protagonist of Arthur Miller's classic play Death of a Salesman, which debuted on Broadway with Lee J. Cobb playing Loman at the Morosco Theatre on February 10, 1949. Loman is a 63-year-old travelling salesman from Brooklyn with 34 years of experience with the same company who endures a pay cut and a firing during the play. He has difficulty dealing with his current state and has created a fantasy world to cope with his situation. This does not keep him from multiple suicide attempts.

Wilson Jermaine Heredia is an American actor best known for his portrayal of Angel Dumott Schunard in the Broadway musical Rent, for which he won the Tony Award and Drama Desk Award for Best Featured Actor in a musical. Heredia also originated the role at London's Shaftesbury Theatre in the West End theatre district and in the 2005 film adaptation.

Chroniclers of the musical theater have been around for years, collecting pictorial surveys, librettos and scores, and recording the careers of various theatrical celebrities. Nothing in the American musical theater has been more inaccessible, however, than the record of its dance traditions, and there are many to recount.

<i>Little Shop of Horrors</i> (musical) 1982  horror comedy rock musical, by composer Alan Menken and writer Howard Ashman

Little Shop of Horrors is a horror comedy rock musical with music by Alan Menken and lyrics and a book by Howard Ashman. The story follows a hapless florist shop worker who raises a plant that feeds on human blood and flesh. The musical is based on the low-budget 1960 black comedy film The Little Shop of Horrors. The music, composed by Menken in the style of early 1960s rock and roll, doo-wop and early Motown, includes several well-known tunes, including the title song, "Skid Row (Downtown)", "Somewhere That's Green", and "Suddenly, Seymour".

Tony Hills

Tony Hills is a fictional character from the BBC soap opera EastEnders, played by Mark Homer from 7 September 1995 to 15 April 1999.

Sunrise at Campobello is a 1958 play by American producer and writer Dore Schary based on U.S. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's struggle with polio. The film version was released in 1960.

Annabelle Wallis British Actress

Annabelle Frances Wallis is an English actress who has played Jane Seymour in Showtime's period drama The Tudors (2009–2010), Grace Burgess in the BBC drama Peaky Blinders (2013–2016), Mia in the supernatural horror film Annabelle (2014) and Jenny Halsey in the supernatural adventure film The Mummy (2017).

<i>Seymour Goes to Hollywood</i>

Seymour Goes to Hollywood, also known as Seymour at the Movies, is a platform and adventure game developed by Big Red Software and originally published in Europe by Codemasters in 1991. Players control Seymour, a small potato-like creature who wishes to be a film star. The film's script has been locked in a safe, meaning Seymour must solve puzzles by collecting and using objects scattered throughout the game in order to progress, ultimately retrieving the script and allowing filming to start.

Anthony Seymour may refer to: