Tony Smith (baseball)

Last updated
Tony Smith
Shortstop
Born:(1884-05-14)May 14, 1884
Chicago, Illinois
Died: February 27, 1964(1964-02-27) (aged 79)
Galveston, Texas
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
August 12, 1907, for the Washington Senators
Last MLB appearance
July 11, 1911, for the Brooklyn Dodgers
MLB statistics
Batting average .180
Home runs 1
Runs batted in 26
Teams

Anthony Smith (May 14, 1884 – February 27, 1964) was an American professional baseball shortstop. He played in Major League Baseball from 1907 through 1911 for the Washington Senators and Brooklyn Superbas / Dodgers.


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