Tony Storti

Last updated
Tony Storti
Biographical details
Born(1922-06-19)June 19, 1922
DiedJanuary 23, 2009(2009-01-23) (aged 86)
Carlsbad, California
Playing career
1946–1947 Delaware
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1948–1951 Stout
1952–1954 Montana State
1956–1957 Montana State
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1952–1958 Montana State
Head coaching record
Overall52–21–3
Tournaments0–0–1 (NAIA playoffs)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 NAIA National (1956)
2 RMC (1954, 1956)

Anthony Wayne Storti (June 19, 1922 – January 23, 2009) was an American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Stout Institute—now known as the University of Wisconsin–Stout–from 1948 to 1951 and two stints at Montana State University, from 1952 to 1954 and from 1956 to 1957, compiling a career college football coaching record of 52–21–3. Storti was also the athletic director at Montana state from 1952 to 1958. He led the 1956 Montana State Bobcats to a tie in the NAIA Football National Championship and a share of the NAIA national title.

Contents

Biography

A native of Eveleth, Minnesota, Storti served in the United States Army during World War II and attended the University of Wisconsin–Stout and the University of Delaware. He was a member of the football team at both schools. Storti died on January 23, 2009 in Carlsbad, California. [1]

Coaching career

Storti began his coaching career at Stout Institute—now known as the University of Wisconsin–Stout—in 1948. During his tenure at Stout, he compiled a 21–9–2 record. [2]

Storti was named the head football coach and athletic director at Montana State University in 1952. Under his direction, the program won its first national championship in 1956.

Storti is an inductee in the University of Wisconsin–Stout Athletic Hall of Fame and Montana State Bobcat Hall of Fame.

Head coaching record

College

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Stout Blue Devils (Wisconsin State College Conference)(1948–1951)
1949 Stout3–4–13–3–1T–6th
1949 Stout6–24–23rd
1950 Stout5–2–13–2–14th
1951 Stout7–15–12nd
Stout:21–9–215–8–2
Montana State Bobcats (Rocky Mountain Conference)(1952–1954)
1952 Montana State6–4
1953 Montana State4–44–12nd
1954 Montana State 8–16–01st
Montana State Bobcats (Rocky Mountain Conference)(1956)
1956 Montana State 9–0–15–01stT NAIA Championship
Montana State Bobcats (NCAA College Division independent)(1957)
1957 Montana State8–2
Montana State:31–12–1
Total:52–21–3
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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References

  1. "Ex-Bobcat head coach Storti dies at 86". Bozeman Daily Chronicle. Retrieved September 25, 2011.
  2. "1979 Hall of Fame Inductees". University of Wisconsin-Stout. Retrieved September 25, 2011.