Tony Von Fricken

Last updated
Tony Von Fricken
Pitcher
Born:(1869-05-30)May 30, 1869
Brooklyn, New York
Died: March 22, 1947(1947-03-22) (aged 77)
Troy, New York
Batted: SwitchThrew: Right
MLB debut
May 9, 1890, for the  Boston Beaneaters
Last MLB appearance
May 9, 1890, for the  Boston Beaneaters
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 0-1
Earned run average 10.13
Strikeouts 2
Teams

Anthony John Von Fricken (May 30, 1869 – March 22, 1947) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball who played in one game with the Boston Beaneaters on May 9, 1890. He pitched the complete game and got the loss, while allowing 16 runs, 9 of which were earned. He struck out 2 and walked 8.


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