Too Young for Love (1953 film)

Last updated
Too Young for Love
Too Young for Love (1953 film).jpg
Directed by Lionello De Felice
Produced by Niccolò Theodoli
Written by André Birabeau (play)
Franco Brusati
Lionello De Felice
Vittorio Nino Novarese
Starring Aldo Fabrizi
Marina Vlady
Fernand Gravey
Music by Mario Nascimbene
Cinematography Mario Montuori
Edited by Mario Serandrei
Production
company
Cormoran Film
Industrie Cinematografiche Sociali
Distributed byDiana Film
Release date
22 August 1953
Running time
85 minutes
CountryFrance
Italy
Language Italian

Too Young for Love (Italian: L'età dell'amore) is a 1953 French-Italian comedy drama film directed by Lionello De Felice and starring Aldo Fabrizi, Marina Vlady and Fernand Gravey. [1] Some of the film was shot on location in Castellana Grotte.

Contents

Synopsis

In a small provincial Italian town, a fifteen-year-old boy meets and falls in love with a girl.

Partial cast

Related Research Articles

Enzo Petito Italian actor

Enzo Petito was an Italian film and stage character actor. A theatre actor under Eduardo De Filippo in the 1950s in the Teatro San Ferdinando of Naples, with whom he was professionally closely associated, Petito also appeared in several of his films, often co-starring Eduardo or/and brother, Peppino De Filippo, brothers who are considered to be amongst the greatest Italian actors of the 20th century. Petito played minor roles in some memorable commedia all'Italiana movies directed by the likes of Dino Risi and Mario Monicelli in the late 1950s and early 1960s, often appearing alongside actors such as Nino Manfredi, Alberto Sordi, Peppino De Filippo, Anna Maria Ferrero, and Totò.

Fernand Gravey Belgian actor

Fernand Gravey, also known as Fernand Gravet in the United States, was the son of actors Georges Mertens and Fernande Depernay, who appeared in silent films produced by pioneer Belge Cinéma Film.

Aldo Fabrizi Italian actor

Aldo Fabrizi was an Italian actor, director, screenwriter and comedian, best known in United Kingdom for the role of the heroic priest in Roberto Rossellini's Rome, Open City and as partner of Totò in a number of successful comedies.

The Nastro d'Argento is a film award assigned each year, since 1946, by Sindacato Nazionale dei Giornalisti Cinematografici Italiani, the association of Italian film critics.

Franco Fabrizi Italian actor

Franco Fabrizi was an Italian actor.

The Nastro d'Argento is a film award assigned each year, since 1946, by Sindacato Nazionale dei Giornalisti Cinematografici Italiani, the association of Italian film critics.

<i>The Last Wagon</i> (1943 film) 1943 film

The Last Wagon is a 1943 Italian comedy film directed by Mario Mattoli and starring Aldo Fabrizi, Anna Magnani, and Anita Durante. A number of the personnel were involved in the subsequent development of neorealism. The hero is the driver of a horse-drawn carriage who objects to the competition from motorised taxis. The film's sets were designed by the art directors Piero Filippone and Mario Rappini. It was shot at the Palatino Studios in Rome and on location around the city.

<i>Prepotenti più di prima</i> 1959 film

Prepotenti più di prima is a 1959 Italian comedy film directed by Mario Mattoli and starring Aldo Fabrizi. It is the sequel of I prepotenti.

<i>Toto, Fabrizi and the Young People Today</i> 1960 film

Toto, Fabrizi and the Young People Today is a 1960 Italian comedy film directed by Mario Mattoli and starring Totò.

Lauro Gazzolo Italian actor

Lauro Gazzolo was an Italian actor and voice actor.

<i>Days of Love</i> 1954 film

Days of Love is a 1954 Italian comedy film directed by Giuseppe De Santis.

<i>Made in Italy</i> (1965 film)

Made in Italy is a 1965 Italian anthology comedy film directed by Nanni Loy.

<i>In Olden Days</i>

In Olden Days is a 1952 Italian anthology comedy-drama-romantic-musical film.

<i>The Overtaxed</i>

I Tartassati is an Italian comedy film from 1959, directed by Stefano Vanzina, written by Aldo Fabrizi, starring Totò and Louis de Funès. The film is known under the titles The Overtaxed (English) and Fripouillard et Compagnie (French).

<i>100 Years of Love</i> 1954 film

100 Years of Love is a 1954 Italian anthology film directed by Lionello De Felice. It stars actor Gabriele Ferzetti.

<i>Il carabiniere a cavallo</i> 1962 film

Il carabiniere a cavallo is a 1962 Italian comedy film directed by Carlo Lizzani.

<i>Anthony of Padua</i> (film)

Anthony of Padua is a 1949 Italian historical drama film directed by Pietro Francisci and starring Aldo Fiorelli, Silvana Pampanini and Carlo Giustini. The film portrays the life of Anthony of Padua (1195–1231).

<i>They Stole a Tram</i>

They Stole a Tram, aka We Stole a Tram, is a 1954 Italian comedy film written by and starring Aldo Fabrizi, and directed by Fabrizi and his assistant director Sergio Leone after director Mario Bonnard) left the film midway completed. Sergio Leone also appeared in a brief scene as a contest presenter, Mario Bava was the film's cinematographer and future horror film director Lucio Fulci contributed to the screenplay. The film's music score was by Carlo Rustichelli.

<i>Allow Me, Daddy!</i>

Allow Me, Daddy! is a 1956 Italian comedy film directed by Mario Bonnard.

<i>The Four Musketeers</i> (1963 film)

The Four Musketeers is a 1963 Italian-French adventure-comedy film co-written and directed by Carlo Ludovico Bragaglia and starring Aldo Fabrizi, Erminio Macario and Nino Taranto. It is a loose parody of Alexandre Dumas' The Three Musketeers.

References

  1. Pintaldi p.62

Bibliography