Topographic Relations of Philip II

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Topographic Relations of the towns from Spain, made under the command of Philip II (Spanish: Relaciones topográficas de los pueblos de España, hechas de orden de Felipe II) is the name by which is commonly known a statistical work supported and encouraged by Philip II of Spain.

The original aim of the project was to offer a detailed description of all the settlements of the kingdoms under his command. By royal order, an extensive questionnaire was sent out, but only a limited number of settlements were actually described in the completed work.


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