Topp baronets

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The Topp Baronetcy, of Tormarton in the County of Gloucester, was a title in the Baronetage of England. It was created on 25 July 1668 for Francis Topp. The title became extinct on the death of the third Baronet in 1733.

Tormarton farm village in the United Kingdom

Tormarton is a village in South Gloucestershire, England. Its name may come from Thor Maer Tun meaning The settlement with the thorn (tree) on the boundary. Another source suggests the name derives from the church tower (Tor) on the border between Wessex and Mercia. It is one mile North-East of junction 18 of the M4 motorway, with the A46 road and close to the border between Wiltshire and South Gloucestershire. In 2001 and 2011 there were 144 households and the population was 348. A National Trail, the Cotswold Way passes through the village. There is a church, a hotel, a pub and also a number of bed and breakfasts in the village. A Highways Agency depot with a salt dome is situated near to the village.

Topp baronets, of Tormarton (1668)

Baronetcies

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Scott baronets

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Cox baronets

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