Topping Cone

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Topping Cone ( 77°29′S169°16′E / 77.483°S 169.267°E / -77.483; 169.267 Coordinates: 77°29′S169°16′E / 77.483°S 169.267°E / -77.483; 169.267 ) is an exposed volcanic cone near Cape Crozier, located 1.75 nautical miles (3.2 km) northwest of the summit of The Knoll in eastern Ross Island. Named by New Zealand Antarctic Place-Names Committee (NZ-APC) for W.W. Topping, geologist with Victoria University of Wellington Antarctic Expedition (VUWAE) which examined the cone in the 1969–70 season.

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