Torda County

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Torda County (German : Komitat Torda, [1] Hungarian : Torda vármegye, [1] Latin : comitatus Thordensis) [1] was a county in Transylvania between the 11th century and 1876.

Contents

History

Kingdom of Hungary

Counties (districts formed around royal fortresses) were the basic units of royal administration in the Kingdom of Hungary from the 11th century. [2] The fortress initially serving as the seat of Torda County was located at a distance of about 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) [3] from modern Torda (now Turda, Romania) above the village Várfalva (now Moldoveneşti, Romania) on the river Aranyos (now Arieș in Romania). [4] A cemetery near the castle was used from the turn of the 10th and 11th centuries. [4]

The earliest royal charter mentioning the castle is from 1075, [5] but only its interpolated version has been preserved. [6] The earliest authentic charter referring to the same castle is dated to 1177. [7] Although the county itself was only first mentioned in 1227, [8] a reference in the charter of 1075 to taxes levied on salt at the castle implies the existence of a system of administration. [9] Reference to an unnamed [10] ispán of Torda was preserved in a charter from 1221. [3] The ispáns of Torda were appointed by the voivodes of Transylvania, the representative of the kings of Hungary in the province. [11]

Eastern Hungarian Kingdom

Principality of Transylvania

Austria-Hungary

List of ispáns

Fourteenth century

TermIncumbentVoivode of TransylvaniaNotesSource
c. 1310Domokos, son of Marcell Járai Ladislaus (III) Kán [12]
c. 1312Miklós, son of Péter Gerendi Ladislaus (III) Kán first rule [12]
c. 1326Miklós, son of Péter Gerendi Thomas Szécsényi second rule [12]
c. 1335Magister Jakab, son of István Thomas Szécsényi [12]
c. 1350Marót, son of Péter Cine of Olaszi [13]
c. 1366János TúriDenis Lackfi [13]

Fifteenth century

Sixteenth century

Seventeenth century

Eighteenth century

Nineteenth century

See also

Footnotes

  1. 1 2 3 Fallenbüchl 1994, p. 153.
  2. Engel 2001, pp. 40-41.
  3. 1 2 Kristó 1988, p. 92.
  4. 1 2 Bóna 1994, p. 163.
  5. Curta 2006, p. 356.
  6. Kristó 2003, p. 91.
  7. Kristó 2003, pp. 91-92.
  8. Kristó 2003, p. 92.
  9. Curta 2006, pp. 251., 356.
  10. Zsoldos 2011, p. 273.
  11. Engel 1996, pp. 11., 246.
  12. 1 2 3 4 Engel 1996, pp. 11., 251.
  13. 1 2 Engel 1996, pp. 12., 251.

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