Torgny Peak

Last updated

Torgny Peak ( 71°51′S8°6′E / 71.850°S 8.100°E / -71.850; 8.100 Coordinates: 71°51′S8°6′E / 71.850°S 8.100°E / -71.850; 8.100 ) is a bare rock peak 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) west of Fenriskjeften Mountain in the Drygalski Mountains of Queen Maud Land. Photographed from the air by the German Antarctic Expedition (1938–39). Mapped from surveys and air photos by Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named for Torgny Vinje, meteorologist with Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60).

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Fenriskjeften Mountain is a large bare rock mountain which in plan resembles a hairpin, forming the southern portion of the Drygalski Mountains in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. It was plotted from air photos by the Third German Antarctic Expedition (1938–39), mapped from surveys and air photos by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60), and because of its shape named Fenriskjeften, after the wolf in Norse mythology.

Drygalski Mountains mountain range

The Drygalski Mountains are a group of scattered mountains and nunataks lying between the Filchner Mountains and the Kurze Mountains in the Orvin Mountains of Queen Maud Land. They were discovered by the Third German Antarctic Expedition (1938–1939), led by Captain Alfred Ritscher, and named for Professor Erich von Drygalski, the leader of the First German Antarctica Expedition of 1901-03. They were remapped from air photos and survey by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Torgny Peak" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


Related Research Articles

Shcherbakov Range is a mountain range trending north-south for 20 miles (32 km), standing immediately east of Mount Dallmann where it marks the east extremity of the Orvin Mountains, in Queen Maud Land. Discovered and plotted from air photos by German Antarctic Expedition, 1938-39. Mapped from air photos and surveys by Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60; remapped by Soviet Antarctic Expedition, 1960–61, and named after Soviet scientist D.I. Shcherbakov (d.1966).

Ulvetanna Peak mountain in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica

Ulvetanna Peak is a sharp peak in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. It was first climbed in February 1994. The mountain was first discovered by the german Artic expedition in 1938 and named after the swiss mountain Matterhorn because of his similar form. Later the mountain was renamed by the norwegians in Ulvetanna Peak.

Mount Neustruyev is a peak in East Antarctica, 2,900 m, standing 5 mi NNE of Gneiskopf Peak in Südliche Petermann Range, Wohlthat Mountains, Queen Maud Land.

Niels Peak is a peak, 2,525 m, rising 3 nautical miles (6 km) north of Nergaard Peak in the Gagarin Mountains of the Orvin Mountains, Queen Maud Land. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos and surveys by the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60. Both Nergaard Peak and Niels Peak are named for Niels Nergaard, a scientific assistant with the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956-58. Both names were proposed in 1967 by the Norwegian philologist Per Hovda (no) (1908–1997).

Mount Nikolayev is the central peak, 2,850 m, of Aurdalsegga Ridge in Sudliche Petermann Range, Wohlthat Mountains. Discovered and plotted from air photos by German Antarctic Expedition, 1938-39. Mapped from air photos and surveys by Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60; remapped by Soviet Antarctic Expedition, 1960–61 and named after Soviet petrographer V.A. Nikolayev.

Cumulus Mountain is a mountain, 2,335 metres (7,660 ft) high, immediately north of the Hogsenga Crags in the Mühlig-Hofmann Mountains of Queen Maud Land. It was mapped from surveys and air photos by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named Cumulusfjellet.

Daykovaya Peak is a prominent peak, 1,995 metres (6,550 ft) high, rising between Mount Hansen and Kare Bench in the Westliche Petermann Range, Wohlthat Mountains. It was discovered and plotted from air photos by the Third German Antarctic Expedition, 1938–39. It was mapped from air photos and surveys by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60; remapped by the Soviet Antarctic Expedition, 1960–61, and named Gora Daykovaya.

Jøkulfallet is a steep ice slope on the north side of Jokulkyrkja Mountain in the Mühlig-Hofmann Mountains of Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. It was plotted from surveys and air photos by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named Jøkulfallet.

Kvitholten Hill is a snow-clad hill at the east side of Austreskorve Glacier, standing just south of Sagbladet Ridge in the Mühlig-Hofmann Mountains of Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. It was plotted from surveys and air photos by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named Kvitholten.

Mount Deryugin is a mountain, 2,635 metres (8,650 ft) high, on Vindegga Spur in the Liebknecht Range, Humboldt Mountains, in Queen Maud Land. It was discovered and plotted from air photos by the Third German Antarctic Expedition, 1938–39. It was mapped from air photos and surveys by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60, remapped by the Soviet Antarctic Expedition, 1960–61, and named after Soviet zoologist K.M. Deryugin.

Gneysovaya Peak is a peak, 2,050 metres (6,730 ft) high, on the ridge connecting Krakken Mountain and Sandseten Mountain in the Westliche Petermann Range, Wohlthat Mountains, Antarctica. It was discovered and plotted from air photos by the Third German Antarctic Expedition, 1938–39. It was mapped from air photos and surveys by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60, remapped by the Soviet Antarctic Expedition, 1960–61, and named "Gora Gneysovaya".

HÃ¥lisen Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Hålisen Glacier is a cirque glacier between Halisrimen Peak and Halisstonga Peak in the Kurze Mountains of Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named Hålisen.

Mount Schicht is a prominent mountain with several summits, rising 4 nautical miles (7 km) west-southwest of Ritscher Peak in the Gruber Mountains of Queen Maud Land. The feature was discovered by the German Antarctic Expedition under Ritscher, 1938–39, and named Schichtberge because of its appearance.

Sagbladet Ridge is a rock ridge at the east side of the mouth of Austreskorve Glacier, in the Muhlig-Hofmann Mountains of Queen Maud Land. Plotted from surveys and air photos by Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named Sagbladet.

Steinskaret Gap is an ice-filled gap in the central Kurze Mountains, just south of Steinskaregga Ridge. Mapped from surveys and air photos by Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named Steinskaret.

Stauren Peak is a peak on Staurneset Spur, in the Muhlig-Hofmann Mountains of Queen Maud Land. Plotted from surveys and air photos by the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named Stauren.

Skarsbrotet Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Skarsbrotet Glacier is a cirque-type glacier draining the east slopes of Skarshaugane Peaks, in the Humboldt Mountains of Queen Maud Land. Discovered and photographed by the German Antarctic Expedition, 1938-39. Mapped by Norway from air photos and surveys by the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60, and named Skarsbrotet.

Skavlrimen Ridge is a largely snow-covered ridge, about 3 nautical miles (6 km) long and surmounted in the north part by Vyatskaya Peak, located 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) east of Dekefjellet Mountain in the Weyprecht Mountains, Queen Maud Land. Discovered and plotted from air photos by German Antarctic Expedition, 1938-39. Replotted from air photos and surveys by Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60, and named Skavlrimen.

Vindegga Spur is a prominent ridge just south of Vindegghallet Glacier in the Humboldt Mountains of Queen Maud Land. Discovered and photographed by the German Antarctic Expedition, 1938-39. Mapped by Norway from air photos and surveys by Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60, and named Vindegga.