Toyohashi Railroad Atsumi Line

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Toyohashi Railroad Atsumi Line
Toyohashi railroad Atsumi line 1185.jpg
A 1800 series EMU at Toshima Station in February 2007
Overview
Locale Aichi Prefecture
Termini Shin-Toyohashi
Mikawa Tahara
Stations16
Service
Type Heavy rail
Operator(s) Toyohashi Railroad
Rolling stock1800 series EMUs
History
Opened22 January 1924
Technical
Line length18.0 km (11.2 mi)
Number of trackssingle
Track gauge 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm)
Electrification 1,500 V DC overhead
Operating speed70 km/h (45 mph)

The Toyohashi Railroad Atsumi Line (豊橋鉄道渥美線, Toyohashi Tetsudō Atsumi-sen) is a railway line in eastern Aichi Prefecture, Japan, operated by the private railway operator Toyohashi Railroad ("Toyotetsu"). The line runs from the centre of Toyohashi, traversing the centre of the Atsumi Peninsula, a largely rural district noted also for its hot spring resorts and marine sports as part of Mikawa Wan Quasi-National Park. The line is entirely within the cities of Toyohashi and Tahara.

Contents

Basic data

Operation

The northern terminal station for the Atsumi Line is located at Shin-Toyohashi Station. All trains run to the southern terminus at Mikawa Tahara Station at approximately 15 minute intervals. There are no express trains on the line.

Station list

No.Station nameJapaneseDistance from
Shin-Toyohashi
(km)
TransfersLocation
CityPrefecture
01 Shin-Toyohashi 新豊橋0.0 Toyohashi Aichi
02 Yagyu-bashi 柳生橋1.0
03 Koike 小池1.7
04 Aichidaigakumae 愛知大学前2.5
05 Minami-Sakae 南栄3.2
06 Takashi 高師4.3
07 Ashihara 芦原5.3
08 Ueta 植田6.3
09 Mukougaoka 向ヶ丘7.1
10 Ōshimizu 大清水8.5
11 Oitsu 老津10.7
12 Sugiyama 杉山12.7
13 Yagumadai やぐま台14.0 Tahara
14 Toshima 豊島15.6
15 Kambe 神戸17.1
16 Mikawa Tahara 三河田原18.0

Rolling stock

1800 series set 1808 in 2014 Toyotetsu1808F.JPG
1800 series set 1808 in 2014

As of April 2015, the line is operated using a fleet of ten three-car 1800 series electric multiple unit (EMU) trains. [1] These trains were modified from former Tokyu 7200 series EMUs. [2] All trains are configured for One-man operation.

Since 2013, the trains are each painted a different colour and carry the names of flowers, as follows. [2]

Set No.Flower nameColour
1801Rose (ばら, Bara)  Red
1802Hibiscus (はまぼう, Hamabou)  Brown
1803Rhododendron (つつじ, Tsutsuji)  Red
1804Sunflower (ひまわり, Himawari)  Blue
1805Sweet flag (菖蒲, Shoubu)  Purple
1806Magnolia (しでこぶし, Shidekobushi)  Light green
1807Rape blossom (菜の花, Nanohana)  Yellow
1808Camellia (椿, Tsubaki)  Green
1809Cherry blossom (, Sakura)  Pink
1810Chrysanthemum (, Kiku)  Orange

History

The privately owned Atsumi Electric Railway (渥美電鉄, Atsumi Dentetsu) began operations on January 22, 1924 between Takashi and Toshima, electrified at 600 V DC. The line was extended to Kambe in March and to Mikawa Tahara by June 10 of the same year. In the opposite direction, the line was extended to Shin-Toyohashi by May 1925. On April 10, 1926, the now-defunct section of track from Mikawa Tahara to Kurokawahara was completed. Construction of a proposed extension to Fukue commenced in 1940, but was later abandoned due to material shortages in World War II.

On September 1, 1940, the Atsumi Electric Railway was merged into Nagoya Railway. Most of the stations on the line were closed on June 5, 1944, as an austerity measure. On October 1, 1954, the Toyohashi Railway was spun out from the Nagoya Railway as an independently operating subsidiary. Most of the closed stations were reopened by this time, but the section from Mikawa Tahara to Kurokawahara was closed permanently. Express train operations began from October 1, 1965.

All freight operations were discontinued from February 1, 1984 and express train operations were discontinued from September 1, 1985. On July 2, 1997 the electrification system was upgraded to 1,500 V DC.

See also

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References

This article incorporates material from the corresponding article in the Japanese Wikipedia.

  1. 私鉄車両編成表 2015[Private Railway Rolling Stock Formations - 2015] (in Japanese). Japan: Kotsu Shimbunsha. 23 July 2015. p. 92. ISBN   978-4-330-58415-7.
  2. 1 2 Terada, Hirokazu (January 2016). 日本のローカル私鉄 30年前の残照を訪ねて その26[Japan's rural private railways: Revisiting the afterglow of 30 years ago (Part 26)]. Japan Railfan Magazine (in Japanese). Vol. 56 no. 657. Japan: Koyusha Co., Ltd. pp. 112–117.