Trójca

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Trójca may refer to the following places in Poland:

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Lesser Poland Voivodeship Voivodeship in Poland

Lesser Poland Voivodeship or Lesser Poland Province, also known as Małopolska Voivodeship or Małopolska Province, is a voivodeship (province), in southern Poland. It has an area of 15,108 square kilometres (5,833 sq mi), and a population of 3,267,731 (2006).

Greater Poland Voivodeship Voivodeship in Poland

Greater Poland Voivodeship, also known as Wielkopolska Voivodeship, Wielkopolska Province, or Greater Poland Province, is a voivodeship, or province, in west-central Poland. It was created on 1 January 1999 out of the former Poznań, Kalisz, Konin, Piła and Leszno Voivodeships, pursuant to the Polish local government reforms adopted in 1998. The province is named after the region called Greater Poland or Wielkopolska(listen). The modern province includes most of this historic region, except for some western parts.

Masovian Voivodeship Voivodeship in Poland

Mazovian Voivodeship or Mazovia Province is the largest and most populous of the 16 Polish provinces, or voivodeships, created in 1999. It occupies 35,579 square kilometres (13,737 sq mi) of east-central Poland, and has 5,324,500 inhabitants. Its principal cities are Warsaw in the centre of the Warsaw metropolitan area, Radom (226,000) in the south, Płock (127,000) in the west, Siedlce (77,000) in the east, and Ostrołęka (55,000) in the north. The capital of the voivodeship is the national capital, Warsaw.

Lower Silesian Voivodeship Voivodeship in Poland

Lower Silesian Voivodeship, or Lower Silesia Province in southwestern Poland, is one of the 16 voivodeships (provinces) into which Poland is divided.

Lublin Voivodeship Voivodeship in Poland

Lublin Voivodeship, or Lublin region, is a voivodeship, or region, located in southeastern Poland. It was created on January 1, 1999, out of the former Lublin, Chełm, Zamość, Biała Podlaska and (partially) Tarnobrzeg and Siedlce Voivodeships, pursuant to Polish local government reforms adopted in 1998. The region is named after its largest city and regional capital, Lublin, and its territory is made of four historical lands: the western part of the voivodeship, with Lublin itself, belongs to Lesser Poland, the eastern part of Lublin Area belongs to Red Ruthenia, and the northeast belongs to Polesie and Podlasie.

Łódź Voivodeship Voivodeship in Poland

Łódź Voivodeship is a province (voivodeship) in central Poland. It was created on 1 January 1999 out of the former Łódź Voivodeship (1975–1999) and the Sieradz, Piotrków Trybunalski and Skierniewice Voivodeships and part of Płock Voivodeship, pursuant to the Polish local government reforms adopted in 1998. The province is named after its capital and largest city, Łódź, pronounced.

<i>Brummbär</i> 1943 German heavy assault gun

The Sturmpanzer was a German armoured infantry support gun based on the Panzer IV chassis used in the Second World War. It was used at the Battles of Kursk, Anzio, Normandy, and was deployed in the Warsaw Uprising. It was known by the nickname Brummbär by Allied intelligence, a name which was not used by the Germans. German soldiers nicknamed it the "Stupa", a contraction of the term Sturmpanzer. Just over 300 vehicles were built and they were assigned to four independent battalions.

Radom County County in Masovian Voivodeship, Poland

Radom County is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Masovian Voivodeship, east-central Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat is the city of Radom, although the city is not part of the county. The county contains three towns: Pionki, 22 km (14 mi) north-east of Radom, Iłża, 27 km (17 mi) south of Radom, and Skaryszew, 12 km (7 mi) south-east of Radom.

Łuków County County in Lublin Voivodeship, Poland

Łuków County is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Lublin Voivodeship, eastern Poland. It was established on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat and largest town is Łuków, which lies 76 kilometres (47 mi) north of the regional capital Lublin. The only other town in the county is Stoczek Łukowski, lying 30 km (19 mi) west of Łuków.

Ruda may refer to:

Dąbrówka may refer to:

Gmina Zgorzelec is a rural gmina in Zgorzelec County, Lower Silesian Voivodeship, in south-western Poland, on the German border. Its seat is the town of Zgorzelec, although the town is not part of the territory of the gmina.

Trójca, Lower Silesian Voivodeship Village in Lower Silesian Voivodeship, Poland

Trójca is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Zgorzelec, within Zgorzelec County, Lower Silesian Voivodeship, in south-western Poland, close to the German border.

Gmina Ustrzyki Dolne is an urban-rural gmina in Bieszczady County, Subcarpathian Voivodeship, in south-eastern Poland. Its seat is the town of Ustrzyki Dolne, which lies approximately 80 kilometres (50 mi) south-east of the regional capital Rzeszów.

Jamna Górna Village in Subcarpathian Voivodeship, Poland

Jamna Górna was a village in the administrative district of Gmina Ustrzyki Dolne, within Bieszczady County, Subcarpathian Voivodeship, in south-eastern Poland. Its geographical location lays approximately 19 kilometres (12 mi) north of Ustrzyki Dolne and 66 km (41 mi) south-east of the regional capital Rzeszów.

Trójca, Podkarpackie Voivodeship Village in Subcarpathian Voivodeship, Poland

Trójca is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Ustrzyki Dolne, within Bieszczady County, Subcarpathian Voivodeship, in south-eastern Poland. It lies approximately 26 kilometres (16 mi) north of Ustrzyki Dolne and 58 km (36 mi) south-east of the regional capital Rzeszów.

15 cm sIG 33 auf Fahrgestell Panzerkampfwagen II (Sf) 1941 German self-propelled artillery

The 15 cm sIG 33 auf Fahrgestell Panzerkampfwagen II (Sf), sometimes referred to as the Sturmpanzer II Bison, was a German assault gun used during World War II.

15 cm sIG 33 (Sf) auf Panzerkampfwagen I Ausf B 1940 German self-propelled infantry gun

The 15 cm sIG 33 (Sf) auf Panzerkampfwagen I Ausf B was a German self-propelled gun used during World War II.

Sturm-Infanteriegeschütz 33B 1941 German self-propelled gun

The Sturm-Infanteriegeschütz 33B was a German self-propelled heavy assault gun used during World War II. A new, fully enclosed, and heavily armored boxy casemate superstructure was built on the chassis of the Sturmgeschütz III. It mounted the improved sIG 33/1 infantry gun, offset to the right side, for which 30 rounds were carried. It could only traverse 3° left and right, elevate 25°, and depress 6°. A MG 34 machine-gun was fitted in a ball mount to the right of the main gun with 600 rounds. Its traverse limits were 15° left and 20° right, and it could elevate 20° and depress 10°.

Greater Poland Place in Poland

Greater Poland, often known by its Polish name Wielkopolska, is a historical region of west-central Poland. Its chief city is Poznań.