Tragedy in the House of Habsburg

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Tragedy in the House of Habsburg
Tragedy in the House of Habsburg.jpg
Directed by Alexander Korda
Written by Lajos Bíró
Produced byAlexander Korda
Starring
Cinematography Nicolas Farkas
Edited by Karl Hartl
Production
company
Korda Film
Distributed by UFA
Release date
30 May 1924
CountryGermany
Languages

Tragedy in the House of Habsburg (German : Tragödie im Hause Habsburg) is a 1924 German silent historical film directed by Alexander Korda and starring María Corda, Kálmán Zátony and Emil Fenyvessy. The film recounts the events of the 1889 Mayerling Incident in which the heir to the Austro-Hungarian Empire committed suicide. Studio filming was done in Berlin with location shooting in Vienna. The film cost $80,000 to make, but only earned back around half of this at the box office. [1]

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References

  1. Kulik p. 39

Bibliography