Transportation in Arkansas

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The State of Arkansas, with Interstates in blue, US Highways in bold yellow, and state highways in narrow yellow AR highways.png
The State of Arkansas, with Interstates in blue, US Highways in bold yellow, and state highways in narrow yellow

Arkansas' transportation system is used to move Arkansans throughout the state, and out of state travelers across the state.

Arkansas State of the United States of America

Arkansas is a state in the southern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2018. Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians. The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta.

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Interstates and highways

Arkansas Highway 45 between Fayetteville and Goshen. Arkansas Highway 45.JPG
Arkansas Highway 45 between Fayetteville and Goshen.

Arkansas first designated a state highway system in 1924, and first numbered its roads in 1926. Arkansas had one of the first paved roads, the Dollarway Road, and one of the first members of the Interstate Highway System. The state maintains a large system of state highways today, in addition to eight Interstates and 20 U.S. Routes.

Dollarway Road historic road in Redfield, Arkansas

The Dollarway Road is a historic road in Redfield, Arkansas that was built in 1913. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.

Interstate Highway System United States highway system

The Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways, commonly known as the Interstate Highway System, is a network of controlled-access highways that forms part of the National Highway System in the United States. The system is named for President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who championed its formation. Construction was authorized by the Federal Aid Highway Act of 1956, and the original portion was completed 35 years later, although some urban routes were cancelled and never built. The network has since been extended. In 2016, it had a total length of 48,181 miles (77,540 km). As of 2016, about one-quarter of all vehicle miles driven in the country use the Interstate system. In 2006, the cost of construction was estimated at about $425 billion.

Air travel

Little Rock National Airport Little Rock National Airport - AR - 25 Mar 2001.jpg
Little Rock National Airport

Little Rock National Airport (Adams Field) and Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport in Highfill in Benton County are Arkansas's main air terminals. Passenger service is also available at Fort Smith, as well as limited service at Texarkana, Russellville, Pine Bluff, Harrison, Ozark Regional Airport Mountain Home, Hot Springs, El Dorado and Jonesboro. Many air travelers in eastern Arkansas use Memphis International Airport. There are regional airports in many of Arkansas' 75 counties.

Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport airport

Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport is in Northwest Arkansas in Highfill, Arkansas, 15 nautical miles northwest of Fayetteville and 10 nautical miles northwest of Springdale. It is often referred to by its IATA code, which is incorporated in the airport's logo as "Fly XNA".

Highfill, Arkansas Town in Arkansas, United States

Highfill is a town in Benton County, Arkansas, United States. The population was 583 at the 2010 census. It is home to the Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport, which serves all of Northwest Arkansas, including the Bentonville–Fayetteville–Siloam Springs–Springdale–Rogers, AR-MO-OK Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Benton County, Arkansas County in the United States

Benton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 221,339, making it the second-most populous county in Arkansas. The county seat is Bentonville. The county was formed on September 30, 1836 and was named after Thomas Hart Benton, a U.S. Senator from Missouri. In 2012, Benton County voters elected to make the county wet, or a non-alcohol prohibition location.

Rail and bus travel

Looking down the tracks of the Arkansas and Missouri Railroad in Washington County Arkansas and Missouri Railroad 001.jpg
Looking down the tracks of the Arkansas and Missouri Railroad in Washington County

The Amtrak Texas Eagle passenger train makes several stops in Arkansas daily on its run from Chicago to San Antonio to Los Angeles.

Amtrak Intercity rail operator in the United States

The National Railroad Passenger Corporation, doing business as Amtrak, is a passenger railroad service that provides medium- and long-distance intercity service in the contiguous United States and to nine Canadian cities.

<i>Texas Eagle</i> passenger train route operated by Amtrak in the central and western United States

The Texas Eagle is a 1,306-mile (2,102 km) passenger train route operated by Amtrak in the central and western United States. Trains run daily between Chicago, Illinois, and San Antonio, Texas. Three days a week, the train operates as a section of the Sunset Limited. The westbound Texas Eagle joins with the westbound Sunset Limited in San Antonio and continues to Los Angeles, California; the eastbound Texas Eagle splits in San Antonio for the journey to Chicago–2,728 miles (4,390 km) total. Prior to 1988, the train was known as the Eagle.

Chicago City in Illinois, United States

Chicago, officially the City of Chicago, is the most populous city in Illinois and the third most populous city in the United States. With an estimated population of 2,716,450 (2017), it is the most populous city in the Midwestern United States. Chicago is the county seat of Cook County, the second most populous county in the United States, and the principal city of the Chicago metropolitan area, which is often referred to as "Chicagoland." The Chicago metropolitan area, at nearly 10 million people, is the third-largest in the United States; the fourth largest in North America ; and the third largest metropolitan area in the world by land area.

See also

Notes

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