Treaty of Bourges

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The Treaty of Bourges was an agreement between the King of England Henry IV and Charles, duke of Orléans signed on 18 May 1412.  In return for military aid against the Burgundy, the Armagnacs offered Henry IV full sovereignty in Gascony. Due to a temporary peace between Armagnacs and Burgundies, the treaty was never fulfilled. [1]

Contents

Context

In November 1407, the duke of Orleans was assassinated, starting a civil war in France between Armagnacs and the Burgundies. In consequence, both parties sought Henry IV's assistance for the war.

In 1411, Henry IV sent a small contingent to help John the Fearless, duke of Burgundy. In 1412, the Armagnacs offered the restitution of Aquitaine in return of military aid. [2]

Agreement

On May 18, 1412, the Armagnacs recognized the sovereignty of Henry IV in the duke of Aquitaine in return for an army of 4 000 men. [3]

As part of the agreement, Thomas of Lancaster, Duke of Clarence, devastated western France south of the Loire. [3] However, the terms of the agreement were never fulfilled due to a temporary peace between the Armagnacs and the Burgundies, also the death of Henry IV in 1413. [2]

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References

  1. "treaty of Bourges". Oxford Reference. Retrieved 2021-02-03.
  2. 1 2 "Hundred Years' War - From the Treaty of Brétigny to the accession of Henry V (1360–1413)". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2021-02-03.
  3. 1 2 Green, David, 1969- (January 2014). The Hundred Years War : a people's history. New Haven. p. 44. ISBN   978-0-300-13451-3. OCLC   876466903.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)