Treaty of Kraków

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The Treaty of Kraków was signed on 8 April 1525 between the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights. It officially ended the Polish–Teutonic War. [1]

Kingdom of Poland (1385–1569) Jagiellon kingdom of Poland, 1385-1569

The Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania joined in a personal union established by the Union of Krewo (1385). The union was transformed into a closer one by the Union of Lublin in 1569, which was shortly followed by the end of the Jagiellon dynasty, which had ruled Poland for two centuries.

The treaty gave Grand Master Albert of Hohenzollern enough autonomy to secede from the Order to become Duke of the new Duchy of Prussia created by secularization of the Monastic state of the Teutonic Knights. This was sealed by the Prussian Homage of 10 April.

Duchy of Prussia historical german state

The Duchy of Prussia or Ducal Prussia was a duchy in the region of Prussia established as a result of secularization of the State of the Teutonic Order during the Protestant Reformation in 1525.

Secularization transformation of a society from close identification with religious values and institutions toward nonreligious values

Secularization is the transformation of a society from close identification and inn with religious values and institutions toward nonreligious values and secular institutions. The secularization thesis refers to the belief that as societies progress, particularly through modernization and rationalization, religion loses its authority in all aspects of social life and governance. The term secularization is also used in the context of the lifting of the monastic restrictions from a member of the clergy.

Prussian Homage

The Prussian Homage or Prussian Tribute was the formal investment of Albert of Prussia as duke of the Polish fief of Ducal Prussia.

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References

  1. John Freely Celestial Revolutionary: Copernicus, the Man and His Universe 2014 - - 0857734903 p 6 The Peace of Thorn was reaffirmed on 8 April 1525 by the Treaty of Krakow, which gave the Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights hereditary possession of the Order's territory, then known as 'Ducal Prussia', as a fief of the Polish Crown.