Trevor Jacques

Last updated

Trevor H. Jacques
Born(1956-07-24)24 July 1956
Died22 May 2021(2021-05-22) (aged 64)
Nationality British and Canadian
Education B.Sc., A.R.C.S., GradInstP
Alma mater Royal College of Science, Imperial College
Occupation IT consultant, author, sex researcher, and sex educator
Years active1979 2021
OrganizationAssociate of the Royal College of Science
Graduate of the Institute of Physics
Member of the Royal College of Science Association
Known for Sex education and advocacy
Notable work
On The Safe Edge (1993)
Alternate Sources (1996)
Gay Guide Canada (1997)
Canada's Gay Guide (1998, 1999)
AwardsPantheon of Leather award, Canadian Region (1994, 1997)
Website TrevorJacques.com

Trevor H. Jacques (born 24 July 1956, died 22 May 2021) was a Canadian author, activist, sex researcher, and IT consultant based in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. His research and writing were in the area of consensual BDSM, sexual fetishism and sexual health. He was also a BDSM switch.

Contents

Jacques was best known for two notable sex books: On The Safe Edge: A Manual for SM Play [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] and Alternate Sources. [6] [7] [8]

Biography

Jacques attended St. Joseph's College, Birkfield, Ipswich, a school run by the De La Salle brothers, from 1967 to 1974. He earned his degree in Physics from the Imperial College of Science and Technology in 1978, thereby becoming an associate of the Royal College of Science (A.R.C.S.) and graduate the Institute of Physics (GradInstP.). From 1979, he worked for Seismograph Service Ltd. as a field seismologist off the coast of the French Congo and Gabon and in England, for two and a half years, before designing the acceptance test specifications and procedure for the missile management system of a European aircraft for Computing Devices Company, in Hastings, East Sussex. In 1981, he emigrated to Toronto to work at Spar Aerospace for nine years on an infrared surveillance system for the Canadian and U.S. navies. Subsequently, he moved to SmartStar and Orapro (database companies) in Toronto, as head of technical support and then director of consulting. He was CIO at Stott Pilates (now Merrithew Health and Fitness) for three years (1998-2001), and continues to provide IT consulting to the company.

Later

He co-founded Toronto's Safer SM Education seminar series in 1991, along with co-authors of On The Safe Edge, Dr. Dale McCarthy (1937-2007, co-founder of the AIDS Committee of Toronto (ACT)), Michael Hamilton, and Sniffer (the latter being a dentist and teacher at the University of Toronto), and both organised and presented the seminars for thirteen years (1991-2004). The seminars led to both the publication of On The Safe Edge and updated versions of Safer SM (a BDSM safer sex pamphlet published by the AIDS Committee of Toronto). [9] [10] [11] [12]

Jacques edited and published Gay Guide Canada [13] and Canada's Gay Guide, 1998 [14] and 1999. [15] He also sponsored the production and printing Toronto's Pride Guide in 1996, [16] 1997, [17] and 1998 [18] on behalf of Pride Toronto. In 2001 [19] and 2002, [20] he edited and published the souvenir guide for the Mr. Leatherman Toronto Competition.

Jacques has contributed articles, interviews, and expert advice to dozens of magazines, newspapers, and radio and television stations in North America and Europe.

Jacques served as an expert witness in the 1998 "Bondage Bungalow" case in north Toronto. On The Safe Edge was cited in the submissions by the BDSM community in London, England to the Law Commission as it prepared its report "Consent in the Criminal Law" (consultation paper 139), as a result of the Spanner case.

In 2009, Jacques was featured in the fourth Canadian edition of the sexuality textbook Understanding Human Sexuality. [21]

Jacques's most recent publication is BDSM: Safer Kinky Sex, in both English and French, for the AIDS Committee of Toronto. It is the third major revision of a safer sex education pamphlet created and edited by the Toronto BDSM community, this time large enough to take the form of a booklet. He also edited the two variants of the previous version (see References). Jacques was invited by ACT to launch the French version in Montréal, in May, 2011.

Awards and recognition

Conferences

Media

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References

  1. Jacques, Trevor; Dr. Dale; Hamilton, Michael; Sniffer (1993). On The Safe Edge: A Manual for SM Play, leatherbound edition (First ed.). Toronto: WholeSM Publishing. p. 352. ISBN   1895857058 . Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  2. Jacques, Trevor; Dr. Dale; Hamilton, Michael; Sniffer (1993). On The Safe Edge: A Manual for SM Play, hardcover edition (First ed.). Toronto: WholeSM Publishing. p. 352. ISBN   1895857066 . Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  3. Jacques, Trevor; Dr. Dale; Hamilton, Michael; Sniffer (1993). On The Safe Edge: A Manual for SM Play, paperback edition (First ed.). Toronto: WholeSM Publishing. p. 352. ISBN   1895857066 . Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  4. Jacques, Trevor; Dr. Dale; Hamilton, Michael; Sniffer (1993). On The Safe Edge: A Manual for SM Play, ebook (First ed.). Toronto: WholeSM Publishing. p. 352. ISBN   9781895857160 . Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  5. "Leather History Timeline, 1993". Leather Archives and Museum. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  6. Jacques, Trevor (1996). Alternate Sources, paperback (First ed.). Toronto: WholeSM Publishing. p. 480. ISBN   1895857090. ISSN   1201-2823 . Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  7. Jacques, Trevor (1996). Alternate Sources, CD-ROM (First ed.). Toronto: WholeSM Publishing. ISBN   1895857155 . Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  8. "Leather History Timeline, 1996". Leather Archives and Museum. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  9. "Safer SM, 1995" (PDF). The AIDS Committee of Toronto. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  10. "Safer SM, 1999" (PDF). The AIDS Committee of Toronto. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  11. "BDSM: Safer Kinky Sex, 1996, 2009, 2010". The AIDS Committee of Toronto. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  12. "BDSM: Jeux 'kinky' plus sécuritaires, 2011". The AIDS Committee of Toronto. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  13. Jacques, Trevor (1997). Gay Guide Canada (First ed.). Toronto: Gay Guide Canada, Inc. p. 176. ISBN   1-894076-00-1 . Retrieved 6 May 2012., 1997,
  14. Jacques, Trevor (1998). Canada's Gay Guide (First ed.). Toronto: Click & Drag. p. 176. ISBN   1-894076-02-8 . Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  15. Jacques, Trevor (1999). Canada's Gay Guide (First ed.). Toronto: Click & Drag. p. 208. ISBN   1-894076-04-4 . Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  16. Jacques, Trevor; Pride Toronto (1996). Pride Guide '96 (1996 ed.). Toronto: Alternate Sources, WholeSM Publishing. p. 98. ISBN   1-895857-13-9. ISSN   1205-8017 . Retrieved 18 December 2013.
  17. Pride Toronto (1997). Pride Guide '97 (1997 ed.). Toronto: Pride Toronto. p. 36. ISSN   1205-8017 . Retrieved 18 December 2013.
  18. Pride Toronto (1998). Pride Guide '98 (1998 ed.). Toronto: Pride Toronto. p. 36. ISSN   1205-8017 . Retrieved 18 December 2013.
  19. Jacques, Trevor; Adkin, David; Gowans, Doug (2001). Mr. Leatherman Toronto Souvenir Guide (2001 ed.). Toronto: Mr. Leatherman Toronto Competition, Inc. p. 56. ISSN   1499-5417 . Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  20. 1 2 Jacques, Trevor; Adkin, David (2002). Mr. Leatherman Toronto Souvenir Guide (PDF) (2002 ed.). Toronto: Mr. Leatherman Toronto Competition, Inc. p. 64. ISSN   1499-5417 . Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  21. Understanding Human Sexuality, In Focus 15.2, pp. 476-477. ISBN   9780070764101, ISBN   0070764107
  22. "Leather History Timeline, 1994". Leather Archives and Museum. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  23. "Leather History Timeline, 1997". Leather Archives and Museum. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  24. Jacques, Trevor (1997). Distribution of visitors to a Kinky Sex Website. p. 8.
  25. Bienvenu, Robert; Jacques, Trevor (1999). Patterns of Development and Practice in Today's BDSM Subcultures: Results from a Survey of SM Practitioners (PDF). p. 68. Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  26. Fedoroff, J. Paul; Jacques, Trevor (2000). BDSM Internet Web "Masters": Gender and Sexual Orientation effects on the internet sex survey responses of self-proclaimed sadomasochists (PDF). p. 2. Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  27. Bienvenu, Robert; McGeorge, H. Jack; Jacques, Trevor (2002). The General Psychological Health of SM Practitioners (PDF). p. 29. Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  28. Bienvenu, Robert; McGeorge, H. Jack; Jacques, Trevor; Fedoroff, J. Paul (2003). An Anonymous Survey Of Self-Identified BDSM Practitioners Using The GHQ (PDF). p. 2. Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  29. Fedoroff, J. Paul; Jacques, Trevor; Curry, Susan; Madrigrano, Gina; Stewart, Wendy; Ahmed, A. G.; Bradford, John (2003). Sex Rôles in a Sample of Self-Identified BDSM Practitioners (PDF). p. 2. Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  30. Jacques, Trevor (2006). Who's on Top? (41MB) (PDF). p. 110. Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  31. Jacques, Trevor H. (2006). Kinky Colours, Sexy Spectra (40MB) (pdf). Toronto. p. 131. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  32. "SexTV". CityTV, SexTV. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  33. "Sex Matters". CP24. Retrieved 7 May 2012.