Trioctagonal tiling

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Trioctagonal tiling
H2 tiling 238-2.png
Poincaré disk model of the hyperbolic plane
Type Hyperbolic uniform tiling
Vertex configuration (3.8)2
Schläfli symbol r{8,3} or
Wythoff symbol 2 | 8 3|
3 3 | 4
Coxeter diagram CDel node.pngCDel 8.pngCDel node 1.pngCDel 3.pngCDel node.png or CDel node 1.pngCDel split1-83.pngCDel nodes.png
CDel label4.pngCDel branch 11.pngCDel split2.pngCDel node.png
Symmetry group [8,3], (*832)
[(4,3,3)], (*433)
Dual Order-8-3 rhombille tiling
Properties Vertex-transitive edge-transitive

In geometry, the trioctagonal tiling is a semiregular tiling of the hyperbolic plane, representing a rectified Order-3 octagonal tiling. There are two triangles and two octagons alternating on each vertex. It has Schläfli symbol of r{8,3}.

Geometry branch of mathematics that measures the shape, size and position of objects

Geometry is a branch of mathematics concerned with questions of shape, size, relative position of figures, and the properties of space. A mathematician who works in the field of geometry is called a geometer.

Rectification (geometry) process of truncating a polytope by marking the midpoints of all its edges, and cutting off its vertices at those points

In Euclidean geometry, rectification or complete-truncation is the process of truncating a polytope by marking the midpoints of all its edges, and cutting off its vertices at those points. The resulting polytope will be bounded by vertex figure facets and the rectified facets of the original polytope.

Triangle shape with three sides

A triangle is a polygon with three edges and three vertices. It is one of the basic shapes in geometry. A triangle with vertices A, B, and C is denoted .

Contents

Symmetry

H2 tiling 334-3.png
The half symmetry [1+,8,3] = [(4,3,3)] can be shown with alternating two colors of triangles, by Coxeter diagram CDel label4.pngCDel branch 11.pngCDel split2.pngCDel node.png.
Uniform dual tiling 433-t01.png
Dual tiling

From a Wythoff construction there are eight hyperbolic uniform tilings that can be based from the regular octagonal tiling.

Wythoff construction method for constructing a uniform polyhedron or plane tiling

In geometry, a Wythoff construction, named after mathematician Willem Abraham Wythoff, is a method for constructing a uniform polyhedron or plane tiling. It is often referred to as Wythoff's kaleidoscopic construction.

In hyperbolic geometry, a uniformhyperbolic tiling is an edge-to-edge filling of the hyperbolic plane which has regular polygons as faces and is vertex-transitive. It follows that all vertices are congruent, and the tiling has a high degree of rotational and translational symmetry.

Drawing the tiles colored as red on the original faces, yellow at the original vertices, and blue along the original edges, there are 8 forms.

It can also be generated from the (4 3 3) hyperbolic tilings:

The trioctagonal tiling can be seen in a sequence of quasiregular polyhedrons and tilings:

In geometry, a quasiregular polyhedron is a semiregular polyhedron that has exactly two kinds of regular faces, which alternate around each vertex. They are edge-transitive and hence a step closer to regular polyhedra than the semiregular which are merely vertex-transitive. The dual figures is also sometimes considered quasiregular, except that they are edge-transitive, face-transitive, and alternate between two regular vertex figures.

See also

Trihexagonal tiling a tiling of the plane by regular hexagons and equilateral triangles, with each edge separating both types of shape

In geometry, the trihexagonal tiling is one of 11 uniform tilings of the Euclidean plane by regular polygons. It consists of equilateral triangles and regular hexagons, arranged so that each hexagon is surrounded by triangles and vice versa. The name derives from the fact that it combines a regular hexagonal tiling and a regular triangular tiling. Two hexagons and two triangles alternate around each vertex, and its edges form an infinite arrangement of lines. Its dual is the rhombille tiling.

Rhombille tiling

In geometry, the rhombille tiling, also known as tumbling blocks, reversible cubes, or the dice lattice, is a tessellation of identical 60° rhombi on the Euclidean plane. Each rhombus has two 60° and two 120° angles; rhombi with this shape are sometimes also called diamonds. Sets of three rhombi meet at their 120° angles and sets of six rhombi meet at their 60° angles.

Related Research Articles

Octagonal tiling

In geometry, the octagonal tiling is a regular tiling of the hyperbolic plane. It is represented by Schläfli symbol of {8,3}, having three regular octagons around each vertex. It also has a construction as a truncated order-8 square tiling, t{4,8}.

Truncated trioctagonal tiling

In geometry, the truncated trioctagonal tiling is a semiregular tiling of the hyperbolic plane. There are one square, one hexagon, and one hexadecagon (16-sides) on each vertex. It has Schläfli symbol of tr{8,3}.

Order-8 triangular tiling

In geometry, the order-8 triangular tiling is a regular tiling of the hyperbolic plane. It is represented by Schläfli symbol of {3,8}, having eight regular triangles around each vertex.

Snub trioctagonal tiling

In geometry, the order-3 snub octagonal tiling is a semiregular tiling of the hyperbolic plane. There are four triangles, one octagon on each vertex. It has Schläfli symbol of sr{8,3}.

Truncated octagonal tiling

In geometry, the Truncated octagonal tiling is a semiregular tiling of the hyperbolic plane. There is one triangle and two hexakaidecagons on each vertex. It has Schläfli symbol of t{8,3}.

Truncated order-8 triangular tiling

In geometry, the truncated order-8 triangular tiling is a semiregular tiling of the hyperbolic plane. There are two hexagons and one octagon on each vertex. It has Schläfli symbol of t{3,8}.

Rhombitrioctagonal tiling

In geometry, the rhombitrioctagonal tiling is a semiregular tiling of the hyperbolic plane. At each vertex of the tiling there is one triangle and one octagon, alternating between two squares. The tiling has Schläfli symbol rr{8,3}. It can be seen as constructed as a rectified trioctagonal tiling, r{8,3}, as well as an expanded octagonal tiling or expanded order-8 triangular tiling.

Order-4 octagonal tiling

In geometry, the order-4 octagonal tiling is a regular tiling of the hyperbolic plane. It has Schläfli symbol of {8,4}. Its checkerboard coloring can be called a octaoctagonal tiling, and Schläfli symbol of r{8,8}.

Rhombitetraoctagonal tiling

In geometry, the rhombitetraoctagonal tiling is a uniform tiling of the hyperbolic plane. It has Schläfli symbol of rr{8,4}. It can be seen as constructed as a rectified tetraoctagonal tiling, r{8,4}, as well as an expanded order-4 octagonal tiling or expanded order-8 square tiling.

Truncated tetraoctagonal tiling

In geometry, the truncated tetraoctagonal tiling is a semiregular tiling of the hyperbolic plane. There are one square, one octagon, and one hexakaidecagon on each vertex. It has Schläfli symbol of tr{8,4}.

Order-8 octagonal tiling

In geometry, the order-8 octagonal tiling is a regular tiling of the hyperbolic plane. It has Schläfli symbol of {8,8} and is self-dual.

Truncated order-8 octagonal tiling

In geometry, the truncated order-8 octagonal tiling is a uniform tiling of the hyperbolic plane. It has Schläfli symbol of t0,1{8,8}.

Snub octaoctagonal tiling

In geometry, the snub octaoctagonal tiling is a uniform tiling of the hyperbolic plane. It has Schläfli symbol of sr{8,8}.

Cantic octagonal tiling

In geometry, the tritetratrigonal tiling or shieldotritetragonal tiling is a uniform tiling of the hyperbolic plane. It has Schläfli symbol of t1,2(4,3,3). It can also be named as a cantic octagonal tiling, h2{8,3}.

Alternated order-4 hexagonal tiling

In geometry, the alternated order-4 hexagonal tiling or ditetragonal tritetratrigonal tiling is a uniform tiling of the hyperbolic plane. It has Schläfli symbol of (3,4,4), h{6,4}, and hr{6,6}.

Order-6 octagonal tiling

In geometry, the order-6 octagonal tiling is a regular tiling of the hyperbolic plane. It has Schläfli symbol of {8,6}.

Truncated hexaoctagonal tiling

In geometry, the truncated hexaoctagonal tiling is a semiregular tiling of the hyperbolic plane. There are one square, one dodecagon, and one hexakaidecagon on each vertex. It has Schläfli symbol of tr{8,6}.

Truncated order-6 octagonal tiling

In geometry, the truncated order-6 octagonal tiling is a uniform tiling of the hyperbolic plane. It has Schläfli symbol of t{8,6}.

Rhombihexaoctagonal tiling

In geometry, the rhombihexaoctagonal tiling is a semiregular tiling of the hyperbolic plane. It has Schläfli symbol of rr{8,6}.

Snub hexaoctagonal tiling

In geometry, the snub hexaoctagonal tiling is a semiregular tiling of the hyperbolic plane. There are three triangles, one hexagon, and one octagon on each vertex. It has Schläfli symbol of sr{8,6}.

References

John Horton Conway British mathematician

John Horton Conway FRS is an English mathematician active in the theory of finite groups, knot theory, number theory, combinatorial game theory and coding theory. He has also contributed to many branches of recreational mathematics, notably the invention of the cellular automaton called the Game of Life. Conway spent the first half of his long career at the University of Cambridge, in England, and the second half at Princeton University in New Jersey, where he now holds the title Professor Emeritus.

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