Triphosphate—protein phosphotransferase

Last updated
diphosphate-protein phosphotransferase
Identifiers
EC no. 2.7.99.1
CAS no. 74092-32-3
Databases
IntEnz IntEnz view
BRENDA BRENDA entry
ExPASy NiceZyme view
KEGG KEGG entry
MetaCyc metabolic pathway
PRIAM profile
PDB structures RCSB PDB PDBe PDBsum
Gene Ontology AmiGO / QuickGO

In enzymology, a triphosphate-protein phosphotransferase (EC 2.7.99.1) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

Contents

triphosphate + [microsomal-membrane protein] diphosphate + phospho-[microsomal-membrane protein]

Thus, the two substrates of this enzyme are triphosphate and microsomal-membrane protein, whereas its two products are diphosphate and [[phospho-[microsomal-membrane protein]]].

Classification

This enzyme belongs to the family of transferases, specifically those transferring phosphorus-containing groups that are not covered by other phosphotransferase families.

Nomenclature

The systematic name of this enzyme class is triphosphate:[microsomal-membrane-protein] phosphotransferase. Other names in common use include diphosphate:microsomal-membrane-protein O-phosphotransferase, (erroneous), DiPPT (erroneous), pyrophosphate:protein phosphotransferase (erroneous), diphosphate-protein phosphotransferase (erroneous), diphosphate:[microsomal-membrane-protein] O-phosphotransferase, and (erroneous).

Related Research Articles

Adenosine triphosphate Chemical compound

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an organic compound and hydrotrope that provides energy to drive many processes in living cells, such as muscle contraction, nerve impulse propagation, condensate dissolution, and chemical synthesis. Found in all known forms of life, ATP is often referred to as the "molecular unit of currency" of intracellular energy transfer. When consumed in metabolic processes, it converts either to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) or to adenosine monophosphate (AMP). Other processes regenerate ATP so that the human body recycles its own body weight equivalent in ATP each day. It is also a precursor to DNA and RNA, and is used as a coenzyme.

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In chemistry, pyrophosphates are phosphorus oxyanions that contain two phosphorus atoms in a P–O–P linkage. A number of pyrophosphate salts exist, such as disodium pyrophosphate (Na2H2P2O7) and tetrasodium pyrophosphate (Na4P2O7), among others. Often pyrophosphates are called diphosphates. The parent pyrophosphates are derived from partial or complete neutralization of pyrophosphoric acid. The pyrophosphate bond is also sometimes referred to as a phosphoanhydride bond, a naming convention which emphasizes the loss of water that occurs when two phosphates form a new P–O–P bond, and which mirrors the nomenclature for anhydrides of carboxylic acids. Pyrophosphates are found in ATP and other nucleotide triphosphates, which are very important in biochemistry.

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References