Tripković

Last updated
Tripković
Origin
Language(s)Serbian, Croatian
Region of originSerbia, Croatia
Other names
Variant form(s) Trifković

Tripković (Serbian Cyrillic : Трипковић) is a Serbian surname.

At least 134 individuals with the surname died at the Jasenovac concentration camp. [1]

It may refer to:

See also

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References

  1. Jasenovac Research Institute. "Victim Search: Tripković".