Tripp Bay

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Tripp Bay is a bay along the coast of Victoria Land formed by a recession in the ice between the Oates Piedmont Glacier and Evans Piedmont Glacier. The bay was first charted by the British Antarctic Expedition, 1907–09. The name appears to have been first used by the British Antarctic Expedition (1910–13) and derives from Tripp Island which lies within the bay.

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Scott Coast is the portion of the coast of Victoria Land between Cape Washington and Minna Bluff. Named by New Zealand Antarctic Place-Names Committee (NZ-APC) in 1961 after Captain Robert Falcon Scott, Royal Navy, leader of the Discovery expedition (1901–04) and the British Antarctic Expedition (1910-13), who lost his life on the return journey from the South Pole. Much of the early exploration of this coastline was accomplished by Scott and his colleagues, and many of the names in the region were bestowed by him.

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Fry Glacier is a glacier draining the slopes at the northeast corner of the Convoy Range and flowing along the south end of the Kirkwood Range into Tripp Bay, Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was first charted by the British Antarctic Expedition, 1907–09, and named for A.M. Fry, a contributor to the expedition.

Evans Piedmont Glacier is a broad ice sheet occupying the low-lying coastal platform between Tripp Island and Cape Archer in Victoria Land. It was circumnavigated in 1957 by the New Zealand Northern Survey Party]of the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1956–58, and was named after Petty Officer Edgar Evans, Royal Navy, of the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910–13, who was one of the South Pole Party under Captain Scott, and who lost his life on the Beardmore Glacier on the return journey.

Granite Harbour is a bay in the coast of Victoria Land, Antarctica, about 14 nautical miles (26 km) long, entered between Cape Archer and Cape Roberts. It was discovered and named by the British National Antarctic Expedition (1901–04) in the Discovery in January 1902, while searching for safe winter quarters for the ship. The name derives from the great granite boulders found on its shores.

Hughes Glacier is a small alpine glacier flowing toward Lake Bonney in Taylor Valley from the Kukri Hills on the south, in Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by the Western Geological Party led by Thomas Griffith Taylor of the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910–13, and named for Professor McKenny Hughes, a geologist at the University of Cambridge.

Marr Glacier is a glacier 2 nautical miles (4 km) west of Goldman Glacier, flowing north from the Kukri Hills into Taylor Valley, Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was charted by the British Antarctic Expedition under Robert Falcon Scott, 1910–13, who it appears also applied the name.

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The Kirkwood Range is a massive coastal mountain range in Antarctica, extending north–south between Fry Glacier and Mawson Glacier. A broad low-level platform on the seaward side of the range is occupied by the Oates Piedmont Glacier. It was named by the New Zealand Northern Survey Party of the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1956–58) for Captain Henry Kirkwood, Royal Navy, captain of the supply ship Endeavour during this period.

Mawson Glacier is a large glacier on the east coast of Victoria Land, Antarctica, descending eastward from the Antarctic Plateau to the north of Trinity Nunatak and the Kirkwood Range, to enter the Ross Sea, where it forms the Nordenskjöld Ice Tongue. The glacier was first mapped by the British Antarctic Expedition (1907–09) and named for Douglas Mawson, the expedition physicist, who later led two other Antarctic expeditions, 1911–14, and 1929–31.

Mackay Glacier is a large glacier in Victoria Land, descending eastward from the Antarctic polar plateau, between the Convoy Range and Clare Range, into the southern part of Granite Harbour. It was discovered by the South Magnetic Pole party of the British Antarctic Expedition, 1907–09, and named for Alistair F. Mackay, a member of the party.

Hooper Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Hooper Glacier is a glacier 3 nautical miles (6 km) long, flowing from the col north of Mount William into the west side of Börgen Bay, Anvers Island, in the Palmer Archipelago, Antarctica. It was surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1955, and named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Peter R. Hooper of FIDS, leader and geologist at the Arthur Harbour station in 1955 and 1956. Gateway Ridge separates Hooper Glacier from William Glacier.

Lammers Glacier is a large glacier flowing east along the north side of Godfrey Upland into the Traffic Circle and Mercator Ice Piedmont, on the east coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. This glacier appears indistinctly in an aerial photograph taken by Sir Hubert Wilkins on December 20, 1928, but shows more clearly in aerial photographs taken by Lincoln Ellsworth in 1935 and the United States Antarctic Service in 1940. It was resighted in 1947 by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition under Finn Ronne, who named it for Lester Lammers, who had contributed nine grown husky dogs and four puppies to the expedition.

References

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document: "Tripp Bay".(content from the Geographic Names Information System )  OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg

Coordinates: 76°37′S162°44′E / 76.617°S 162.733°E / -76.617; 162.733