Tristan Hahót

Last updated
Tristan Hahót
Hahot Terestyen pecset 1255.jpg
Seal of Tristan Hahót, 1255
Count of the Heralds
Reign1255
Predecessorunknown
SuccessorPobor (?)
Diedafter 1267
Noble family gens Hahót
Issue
Michael III
John I
Father Buzád II

Tristan from the kindred Hahót (Hungarian : Hahót nembeli Trisztán or Terestyén; died after 1267) was a Hungarian noble, who served as Count of the Heralds (Hungarian : hirdetőispán; Latin : comes preconum) in 1255. [1]

Contents

Biography

Tristan was born into the Buzád branch of the gens Hahót as the son of powerful baron Buzád II Hahót, who later entered the Dominican Order, and after his murder by invading Mongols, now he is considered as a Christian martyr by the Catholic Church. Tristan had three brothers: Buzád III, Csák I and Lancelot (Lankrét). Tristan had two sons from his unidentified spouse, including Michael III, who became patron of the Premonstratensian monastery at Rajk in 1275, receiving the right from the sons of Csák I. [2]

His typarium is one of the most notable examples of seal usage of aristocrats in medieval Hungary. He inherited his seal from his father, depicting head of an ox, while Tristan added letters to his seal in order to distinguish himself from his distant relatives, the Arnold branch of the clan. [3] In order to protect his possessions at Muraköz (today: Međimurje, Croatia), he built a timber fortification, and the nearby village was still called as Terestyéntornya (lit. "Tristan's Tower") in the 15th century. [4]

Related Research Articles

Julius (III) from the kindred Kán was a Hungarian noble from the Siklós branch of the gens Kán as the son of Nicholas I Kán, who served as ispán (comes) of Baranya and Tolna Counties in 1294. He had a brother, Peter de Siklós, who inherited his estates and functioned as ispán of Baranya County in 1313.

Csák I Hahót

Csák (I) from the kindred Hahót was a Hungarian noble who held several secular positions during the reign of King Béla IV. Initially, he was a strong and influential supporter of the king's son, Duke Stephen, later returned to Béla's allegiance.

Csák (II) from the kindred Hahót was a Hungarian noble, who served as bearer of the sword between 1256 and 1257. He was the ancestor of the Csányi noble family.

Buzád Hahót

Buzád II Hahót, O.P., was a Hungarian nobleman, the first known Ban of Severin. He later gave up his position in society and entered the Dominican Order.

Atyusz was the name of a gens in the Kingdom of Hungary, several prominent secular dignitaries came from this kindred.

Macarius (I) from the kindred Monoszló was a Hungarian noble, the first known member of the gens Monoszló.

Hahót (genus)

Hahót or Hahót–Buzád was the name of a gens in the Kingdom of Hungary, several prominent secular dignitaries came from this kindred. The last noble family, which originated from the kindred, became extinct in 1849.

Panyit Hahót

Panyit from the kindred Hahót was a Hungarian robber baron, who became infamous for his violent actions and plunderings against neighboring estates in the 1250s and 60s.

James from the kindred Hahót was a Hungarian noble, who served as Master of the stewards for Queen Dowager Elizabeth in 1280.

Thomas from the kindred Hahót was a Hungarian prelate, who served as the Archbishop of Kalocsa from 1254 to 1256.

Hahold (IV) from the kindred Hahót was a Hungarian noble.

Hahold I Hahót

Hahold (I) from the kindred Hahót, also known as Hahold the Great, was a German mercenary knight possibly from Thuringia who settled down in the Kingdom of Hungary. Promoting to the Hungarian nobility, he became the first member of the gens Hahót, thus he was also the forefather of the late medieval powerful Bánfi de Alsólendva family.

Atyusz from the kindred Hahót was a Hungarian noble, who served as ispán of several counties in the second half of the 13th century. He was also the ancestor of the Szabari noble family.

Michael (I) from the kindred Hahót was a Hungarian noble, who served as ispán of Varaždin County in 1244.

Stephen (I) from the kindred Hahót was a Hungarian noble, who served as ispán of Varaždin County in 1297.

Szécs was the name of a gens in the Kingdom of Hungary.

Simon from the kindred Kacsics was a Hungarian lord at the turn of the 13th and 14th centuries, who served as Count of the Székelys from 1321 to 1327.

Péc or Pécz was the name of a gens in the Kingdom of Hungary. The powerful and illustrious Marcali and Apponyi noble families descended from this kindred. The clan had large-scale possessions in several counties of Transdanubia, in addition to Slavonia and other parts of the Kingdom of Hungary.

Ivánka (II) from the kindred Hont-Pázmány was a Hungarian noble in the second half of the 13th century. He served as Judge royal sometime in the 1280s.

Budmér was the name of a minor gens in the Kingdom of Hungary, which possessed lands in Southern Transdanubia, mostly Baranya County.

References

  1. Zsoldos 2011, p. 243.
  2. Engel: Genealógia (Genus Hahót 1.)
  3. Körmendi 2009, p. 414.
  4. Karácsonyi 1901, p. 125.

Sources

Tristan
Born: ?  Died: after 1267
Political offices
Preceded by
unknown
Count of the Heralds
1255
Succeeded by
Pobor (?)