Trite

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Trite
Trite.planiceps.jpg
T. planiceps
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Chelicerata
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Infraorder: Araneomorphae
Family: Salticidae
Subfamily: Salticinae
Genus: Trite
Simon, 1885
Type species
Trite pennata
Simon, 1885
Species

see text

Diversity
21 species

Trite is a genus of jumping spiders first described by Eugène Simon in 1885. [1] Most of the 18 described species occur in Australia and New Zealand, with several spread over islands of Oceania, one species even reaching Rapa in French Polynesia. [2]

Contents

Species

According to the World Spider Catalog in October 2018, there were twenty one recognised species: [2]

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References

  1. Simon, E. (1885). "Matériaux pour servir à la faune arachnologique de la Nouvelle Calédonie". Annales de la Société Entomologique de Belgique. 29: 87–92.
  2. 1 2 World Spider Catalog (2018). "Trite Simon, 1885". World Spider Catalog. 19.5. Bern: Natural History Museum. Retrieved 13 September 2018.