Triumph Trident

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Triumph Trident 900 Triumph Trident 900.jpg
Triumph Trident 900

The Triumph Trident is a three-cylinder motorcycle of either 750 cc or 900 cc capacity. These bikes were produced from 1990 onwards at Hinckley, Leicestershire, England, by Triumph Motorcycles Ltd, the successor business to the defunct Triumph Engineering at Meriden Works, Warwickshire, England.

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Triumph 900 cc engine in Daytona Sprint Special (LH) Triumph 900cc engine in Daytona Sprint Special (LH).jpg
Triumph 900 cc engine in Daytona Sprint Special (LH)
Triumph 900 cc engine in Daytona Sprint Special (RH) Triumph 900cc engine in Daytona Sprint Special (RH).jpg
Triumph 900 cc engine in Daytona Sprint Special (RH)

Overview

A range of new 750 cc and 900 cc triple-cylinder bikes (and 1000 cc and 1200 cc four-cylinder bikes) were launched at the September 1990 Cologne Motorcycle Show. The motorcycles used famous model names from the glory days of Meriden Triumph and were first made available to the public between March (Trophy 1200 being the first) and September 1991. All used a modular liquid-cooled DOHC engine design in a common steel frame with large-diameter backbone design. The modular design ensured that a variety of models could be offered whilst keeping production costs under control—an idea originally proposed, in air-cooled form, in the early 1970s by Bert Hopwood but not implemented by the (then) BSA-Triumph company. [1]

Further models

The modular range of engines lent itself to the creation of further models, including the Sprint (a sports tourer), Daytona (a fully faired sport bike), and Daytona Sprint (a café racer). The Sprint was in due course succeeded by the Sprint ST.

Reception

Motor Cycle News declared that the reborn Triumph Trident 900 "was one of the best of their early machines. The three-cylinder motor was distinctive, flexible and robust, the handling, though tall, better than the average roadster, and it was comfortable". [2]

See also

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References

  1. "Bike" magazine - date to follow
  2. "TRIUMPH TRIDENT 900 (1991-1998) Review".