Trivelpiece Island

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Trivelpiece Island ( 64°44′S64°9′W / 64.733°S 64.150°W / -64.733; -64.150 Coordinates: 64°44′S64°9′W / 64.733°S 64.150°W / -64.733; -64.150 ) is an island in Wylie Bay, located northeast of Halfway Island. Named for Wayne Z. and Susan Green Trivelpiece, who studied seabird ecology in the Antarctic Peninsula area for over twenty years.

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PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document: "Trivelpiece Island".(content from the Geographic Names Information System )  OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg


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