Troitsky, Russia

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Troitsky (Russian : Тро́ицкий; masculine), Troitskaya (Тро́ицкая; feminine), or Troitskoye (Тро́ицкое; neuter) is the name of several rural localities in Russia.

Russian language East Slavic language

Russian is an East Slavic language, which is official in the Russian Federation, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, as well as being widely used throughout Eastern Europe, the Baltic states, the Caucasus and Central Asia. It was the de facto language of the Soviet Union until its dissolution on 25 December 1991. Although, nowadays, nearly three decades after the breakup of the Soviet Union, Russian is used in official capacity or in public life in all the post-Soviet nation-states, as well as in Israel and Mongolia, the rise of state-specific varieties of this language tends to be strongly denied in Russia, in line with the Russian World ideology.

The classification system of the types of inhabited localities in Russia, the former Soviet Union, and some other post-Soviet states has certain peculiarities compared with the classification systems in other countries.

Contents

Modern localities

Altai Krai

As of 2010, three rural localities in Altai Krai bear this name:

Altai Krai First-level administrative division of Russia

Altai Krai is a federal subject of Russia. It borders with, clockwise from the west, Kazakhstan, Novosibirsk and Kemerovo Oblasts, and the Altai Republic. The krai's administrative center is the city of Barnaul. As of the 2010 Census, the population of the krai was 2,419,755.

Aleysky District District in Altai Krai, Russia

Aleysky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the fifty-nine in Altai Krai, Russia. It is located in the center of the krai. The area of the district is 3,400 square kilometers (1,300 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Aleysk. Population: 16,800 (2010 Census); 20,474 (2002 Census); 21,510 (1989 Census).

Troitsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the fifty-nine in Altai Krai, Russia. It is located in the eastern central part of the krai. The area of the district is 4,200 square kilometers (1,600 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Troitskoye. Population: 24,868 (2010 Census); 30,538 (2002 Census); 34,383 (1989 Census). The population of Troitskoye accounts for 40.4% of the district's total population.

Ust-Pristansky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the fifty-nine in Altai Krai, Russia. It is located in the center of the krai. The area of the district is 2,700 square kilometers (1,000 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Ust-Charyshskaya Pristan. Population: 13,409 (2010 Census); 16,806 (2002 Census); 19,891 (1989 Census). The population of Ust-Charyshskaya Pristan accounts for 37.5% of the district's total population.

Amur Oblast

As of 2010, one rural locality in Amur Oblast bears this name:

Amur Oblast First-level administrative division of Russia

Amur Oblast is a federal subject of Russia, located on the banks of the Amur and Zeya Rivers in the Russian Far East. The administrative center of the oblast, the city of Blagoveshchensk, is one of the oldest settlements in the Russian Far East, founded in 1856. It is a traditional center of trade and gold mining. The territory is accessed by two railways: the Trans-Siberian Railway and the Baikal–Amur Mainline. As of the 2010 Census, the oblast's population was 830,103.

Ivanovsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty in Amur Oblast, Russia. The area of the district is 2,655 square kilometers (1,025 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Ivanovka. Population: 26,509 (2010 Census); 29,496 ; 32,488 (1989 Census). The population of Ivanovka accounts for 25.0% of the district's total population.

Arkhangelsk Oblast

As of 2014, one rural locality in Arkhangelsk Oblast bears this name:

Arkhangelsk Oblast First-level administrative division of Russia

Arkhangelsk Oblast is a federal subject of Russia. It includes the Arctic archipelagos of Franz Josef Land and Novaya Zemlya, as well as the Solovetsky Islands in the White Sea. Arkhangelsk Oblast also has administrative jurisdiction over Nenets Autonomous Okrug. Including Nenetsia, Arkhangelsk Oblast has an area of 587,400 km2. Its population was 1,227,626 as of the 2010 Census.

Astrakhan Oblast

As of 2010, one rural locality in Astrakhan Oblast bears this name:

Republic of Bashkortostan

As of 2010, three rural localities in the Republic of Bashkortostan bear this name:

Belgorod Oblast

As of 2010, one rural locality in Belgorod Oblast bears this name:

Bryansk Oblast

As of 2010, two rural localities in Bryansk Oblast bear this name:

Republic of Buryatia

As of 2010, two rural localities in the Republic of Buryatia bear this name:

Chuvash Republic

As of 2010, one rural locality in the Chuvash Republic bears this name:

Republic of Ingushetia

As of 2010, one rural locality in the Republic of Ingushetia bears this name:

Republic of Kalmykia

As of 2010, one rural locality in the Republic of Kalmykia bears this name:

Kaluga Oblast

As of 2010, five rural localities in Kaluga Oblast bear this name:

Kemerovo Oblast

As of 2010, one rural locality in Kemerovo Oblast bears this name:

Khabarovsk Krai

As of 2010, one rural locality in Khabarovsk Krai bears this name:

Republic of Khakassia

As of 2010, one rural locality in the Republic of Khakassia bears this name:

Kirov Oblast

As of 2010, two rural localities in Kirov Oblast bear this name:

Kostroma Oblast

As of 2010, three rural localities in Kostroma Oblast bear this name:

Krasnodar Krai

As of 2010, three rural localities in Krasnodar Krai bear this name:

Krasnoyarsk Krai

As of 2014, one rural locality in Krasnoyarsk Krai bears this name:

Kurgan Oblast

As of 2010, two rural localities in Kurgan Oblast bear this name:

Kursk Oblast

As of 2010, seven rural localities in Kursk Oblast bear this name:

Lipetsk Oblast

As of 2010, four rural localities in Lipetsk Oblast bear this name:

Mari El Republic

As of 2010, one rural locality in the Mari El Republic bears this name:

Republic of Mordovia

As of 2010, one rural locality in the Republic of Mordovia bears this name:

Moscow Oblast

As of 2010, seven rural localities in Moscow Oblast bear this name:

Nizhny Novgorod Oblast

As of 2010, two rural localities in Nizhny Novgorod Oblast bear this name:

Republic of North Ossetia–Alania

As of 2010, one rural locality in the Republic of North Ossetia–Alania bears this name:

Novosibirsk Oblast

As of 2010, four rural localities in Novosibirsk Oblast bear this name:

Omsk Oblast

As of 2010, one rural locality in Omsk Oblast bears this name:

Orenburg Oblast

As of 2010, five rural localities in Orenburg Oblast bear this name:

Oryol Oblast

As of 2010, eight rural localities in Oryol Oblast bear this name:

Penza Oblast

As of 2010, two rural localities in Penza Oblast bear this name:

Primorsky Krai

As of 2010, one rural locality in Primorsky Krai bears this name:

Pskov Oblast

As of 2010, one rural locality in Pskov Oblast bears this name:

Rostov Oblast

As of 2010, three rural localities in Rostov Oblast bear this name:

Ryazan Oblast

As of 2010, three rural localities in Ryazan Oblast bear this name:

Sakhalin Oblast

As of 2010, one rural locality in Sakhalin Oblast bears this name:

Samara Oblast

As of 2010, three rural localities in Samara Oblast bear this name:

Smolensk Oblast

As of 2010, four rural localities in Smolensk Oblast bear this name:

Stavropol Krai

As of 2010, one rural locality in Stavropol Krai bears this name:

Sverdlovsk Oblast

As of 2010, four rural localities in Sverdlovsk Oblast bear this name:

Tambov Oblast

As of 2010, four rural localities in Tambov Oblast bear this name:

Republic of Tatarstan

As of 2010, two rural localities in the Republic of Tatarstan bear this name:

Tula Oblast

As of 2010, five rural localities in Tula Oblast bear this name:

Tver Oblast

As of 2010, six rural localities in Tver Oblast bear this name:

Tyumen Oblast

As of 2010, one rural locality in Tyumen Oblast bears this name:

Udmurt Republic

As of 2010, one rural locality in the Udmurt Republic bears this name:

Ulyanovsk Oblast

As of 2010, one rural locality in Ulyanovsk Oblast bears this name:

Volgograd Oblast

As of 2010, two rural localities in Volgograd Oblast bear this name:

Vologda Oblast

As of 2010, three rural localities in Vologda Oblast bear this name:

Voronezh Oblast

As of 2010, six rural localities in Voronezh Oblast bear this name:

Yaroslavl Oblast

As of 2010, six rural localities in Yaroslavl Oblast bear this name:

Abolished localities

Historical names

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References

Notes

  1. Inhabited Localities of the Republic of Tatarstan, p. 181

Sources