Trollfjord

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Trollfjord
Trollfjorden
Fiordo de Troll, Lofoten, Noruega, 2019-09-05, DD 66.jpg
View of the fjord
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Trollfjorden
Location of the fjord
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Trollfjorden
Trollfjorden (Norway)
Location Nordland county, Norway
Coordinates 68°21′46″N14°56′10″E / 68.3628°N 14.9361°E / 68.3628; 14.9361 Coordinates: 68°21′46″N14°56′10″E / 68.3628°N 14.9361°E / 68.3628; 14.9361
Type Fjord
Basin  countries Norway
Max. length2 kilometres (1.2 mi)
Max. width600 to 1,100 m (2,000 to 3,600 ft)
Max. depth72 metres (236 ft)

The Trollfjord or Trollfjorden is a fjord in Hadsel Municipality in Nordland county, Norway. The 2-kilometre (1.2 mi) long fjord cuts into the island of Austvågøya and flows out into the Raftsundet strait. The fjord has a narrow entrance and steep-sided mountains surrounding it. The name is derived from troll, a figure from Norse mythology.

Contents

The fjord is a popular tourist attraction due to the beauty of its natural setting. It is only accessible by boat or by a nearby 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) hike over very rugged terrain. The Hurtigruten's ships on the route between Bergen and Kirkenes detour into Trollfjorden. It is also popular with other cruise lines.

Geography

The mouth of the Trollfjord where it joins the Raftsundet is only 100 metres (330 ft) wide. The fjord widens to a maximum width of 800 metres (2,600 ft). The mountains surrounding Trollfjord are between 600 to 1,100 metres (2,000 to 3,600 ft) high. It is surrounded by the 1,084-metre (3,556 ft) tall mountain Trolltindan to the south and the 998-metre (3,274 ft) tall mountain Blåfjell and the 980-metre (3,220 ft) tall mountain Litlkorsnestinden to the north. The Trollfjord reaches a maximum depth of 72 metres (236 ft) below sea level. [1]

Prior to 1960, there was a waterfall at the end of Trollfjorden, but it was redirected to produce hydroelectricity at a nearby power station.

Controversy

The location of the fjord is a bit of a local controversy. In 2016, the movie Downsizing was filmed in the Trollfjord and it was advertised and discussed in the media as having been filmed in Lofoten, a traditional region of Norway. This, however, upset some in the neighboring traditional region of Vesterålen who claim the fjord as part of their region as well. Both sides claim to be right. The fjord is located on Austvågøya island (which is often considered part of Lofoten), but it is also in Hadsel Municipality (which is often considered part of Vesterålen). [2]

History

The Battle of Trollfjord

The Battle of Trollfjord (Norwegian : Trollfjordslaget) was fought in 1890 between the first industrial, steam-driven fishing ships and teams of traditional open-boat fishermen over access to the fjord. Johan Bojer described the battle in his 1921 novel The last of the Vikings (Den siste Viking).

A painting by Gunnar Berg, Trollfjordslaget depicts The Battle at Trollfjord. The painting is currently located in the Art Galleri Gunnar Berg on the island Svinøya in Svolvær town. [3]

Related Research Articles

Nordland County (fylke) of Norway

Nordland is a county in Norway in the Northern Norway region, bordering Troms og Finnmark in the north, Trøndelag in the south, Norrbotten County in Sweden to the east, Västerbotten County to the southeast, and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. The county was formerly known as Nordlandene amt. The county administration is in Bodø. The remote Arctic island of Jan Mayen has been administered from Nordland since 1995.

Vestvågøy Municipality in Nordland, Norway

Vestvågøy is a municipality in Nordland county, Norway. It is part of the traditional district of Lofoten. The administrative centre of the municipality is the town of Leknes. Some of the villages in the municipality include Ballstad, Borg, Bøstad, Gravdal, Knutstad, Stamsund, and Tangstad. With over 11,300 inhabitants, Vestvågøy is the most populous municipality in all of the Lofoten and Vesterålen regions in Nordland county.

Vågan Municipality in Nordland, Norway

Vågan is a municipality in Nordland county, Norway. It is part of the traditional district of Lofoten. The administrative centre of the municipality is the town of Svolvær. Some of the villages in Vågan include Digermulen, Gimsøysand, Gravermarka, Henningsvær, Hopen, Kabelvåg, Kleppstad, Laupstad, Liland, Skrova, Straumnes, and Sydalen.

Hadsel Municipality in Nordland, Norway

Hadsel is a municipality in Nordland county, Norway. It is part of the traditional district of Vesterålen. The administrative centre of the municipality is the town of Stokmarknes. Other villages in Hadsel include Fiskebøl, Gjerstad, Grønning, Grytting, Hanøyvika, Hennes, Kaljord, Melbu, Sanden, and Sandnes.

Lofoten archipelago and traditional district in Nordland county, Norway

Lofoten is an archipelago and a traditional district in the county of Nordland, Norway. Lofoten is known for a distinctive scenery with dramatic mountains and peaks, open sea and sheltered bays, beaches and untouched lands. Its capital and largest town, Leknes, lies approximately 169 km inside the Arctic Circle, or approximately 2,420 km away from the North Pole, thus making Lofoten one of the world's northernmost populated regions. Though lying within the Arctic Circle, the archipelago experiences one of the world's largest elevated temperature anomalies relative to its high latitude.

Stokmarknes Town in Northern Norway, Norway

Stokmarknes  is a town and the administrative centre of Hadsel Municipality in Nordland county, Norway. It is located on the northern coast of the island of Hadseløya and on the small, neighboring island of Børøya. In 2000, Stokmarknes received "town status". The 2.47-square-kilometre (610-acre) town has a population (2018) of 3,367 which gives the town a population density of 1,363 inhabitants per square kilometre (3,530/sq mi).

Hinnøya large island of Troms and Nordland, Norway

Hinnøya is the fourth largest island in Norway. The 2,204.7-square-kilometre (851.2 sq mi) lies just off the western coast of Northern Norway. The island sits on the border of Nordland and Troms og Finnmark counties. The western part of the island is in the district of Vesterålen, the southwestern part is in the Lofoten district, the southeastern part is in the Ofoten district, and the northeastern part is in Southern Troms.

Northern Norway Region of Norway

Northern Norway is a geographical region of Norway, consisting of the two northernmost counties Nordland and Troms og Finnmark, in total about 35% of the Norwegian mainland. Some of the largest towns in Northern Norway are Mo i Rana, Bodø, Narvik, Harstad, Tromsø and Alta. Northern Norway is often described as the land of the midnight sun and the land of the northern lights. Further north, halfway to the North Pole, is the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard, traditionally not regarded as part of Northern Norway.

Vesterålen archipelago and district in Norway

Vesterålen is a district and archipelago in Nordland county, Norway. It is located just north of the Lofoten district and archipelago and west of the town of Harstad. It is the northernmost part of Nordland county, including the municipalities of Andøy, Bø, Hadsel, Sortland, and Øksnes.

Svolvær Town in Northern Norway, Norway

Svolvær is the administrative centre of Vågan Municipality in Nordland County, Norway. It is located on the island of Austvågøya in the Lofoten archipelago, along the Vestfjorden. The 2.37-square-kilometre (590-acre) town has a population (2018) of 4,720 which gives the town a population density of 1,992 inhabitants per square kilometre (5,160/sq mi).

Raftsund Bridge bridge in Hadsel, Norway

The Raftsund Bridge is a two-lane cantilever road bridge in Hadsel Municipality in Nordland county, Norway. The bridge carries the European route E10 highway and it crosses the Raftsundet strait between the islands of Austvågøya and Hinnøya. The bridge is 711 metres (2,333 ft) long, the main span is 298 metres (978 ft), and the maximum clearance to the sea beneath the bridge is 45 metres (148 ft). The bridge has 4 spans.

Hadselfjord fjord in Hadsel, Norway

Hadselfjorden or Hadselfjord is a fjord in Hadsel Municipality in Nordland county, Norway. The fjord lies in the Vesterålen region, separating the island of Hadseløya from the islands of Austvågøya and Hinnøya island. In the northeast, the Hadselfjorden connects with Sortlandssund strait, which separates the islands of Langøya and Hinnøya. In the southwest the fjord empties into the Norwegian Sea.

Austvågøy island in Nordland, Norway

Austvågøya is the northeasternmost of the larger islands in the Lofoten archipelago in Nordland county, Norway. It is located between the Vestfjorden and the Norwegian Sea. The island of Vestvågøya lies to the southwest and the large island of Hinnøya to the northeast. In 2017, island had about 9,000 residents.

Hadseløya island in Hadsel, Norway

Hadseløya or Hadseløy is an island in Hadsel Municipality in Nordland county, Norway. It is located in the Vesterålen region on the north side of the Hadselfjorden. The town of Stokmarknes is situated on the northern shore of the island and the village of Melbu is on the southern coast.

Higravstinden mountain in Norway

Higravtindan or Higravstindan is the tallest mountain on the island of Austvågøya in the Lofoten archipelago in Nordland county, Norway. It is located on the border of Hadsel Municipality and Vågan Municipality. The village of Laupstad and the European route E10 highway are located about 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) west of the mountain and the village of Liland is located about 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) southwest of the mountain. There is a glacier located on the east side of the mountain.

Gunnar Berg (painter) Norwegian painter

Gunnar Berg was a Norwegian painter, known for his paintings of his native Lofoten. He principally painted memorable scenes of the everyday life of the local fishermen.

Litlkorsnestinden mountain in Vågan, Norway

Litlkorsnestinden, or Trakta, is a mountain in Hadsel Municipality in Nordland county, Norway. The 980-metre (3,220 ft) tall mountain lies on the island of Austvågøya in the Lofoten archipelago, just north of the Trollfjorden. The summit is the most difficult to reach in Norway, and requires climbing up to grade 6-. (NOR). It was first ascended in 1910 by Alf Bonnevie Bryn, Ferdinand Schjelderup and Carl Wilhelm Rubenson.

Fløyfjellet mountain in Vågan, Norway

Fløya or Fløyfjellet is a mountain adjacent to the town of Svolvær in Vågan Municipality in Nordland county, Norway. The 590-metre (1,940 ft) tall mountain is located near the southeastern shore of the island of Austvågøya in the Lofoten archipelago.

Raftsundet strait in Nordland, Norway

Raftsundet is a strait in Nordland county, Norway. The 25-kilometre (16 mi) long strait runs between the islands of Hinnøya and Austvågøya, mostly in Hadsel Municipality, but the southern end is in Vågan Municipality. The strait is crossed by the Raftsund Bridge near the northern mouth of the strait. The Trollfjorden is a small fjord that branches off the strait to the west and it is a well-known tourist attraction. The island of Stormolla lies at the southern mouth where the strait joins the Vestfjorden.

Brottøya island in Hadsel, Norway

Brottøya or Brottøy is an island in Hadsel Municipality in Nordland county, Norway. The island lies in the Hadselfjorden, on the west side of the northern entrance to the Raftsundet strait. Brottøya has an area of approximately 2.8 square kilometres (1.1 sq mi) and the highest point is the 64-metre (210 ft) tall mountain Durmålshaugen.

References

  1. "Trollfjord – the spectacular Arctic fjord". Fjord Travel Norway. Retrieved 2018-12-23.
  2. Ødegård, Johannes; Dalen, Ole; Lysvold, Susanne (2016-08-03). "Hollywood-innspilling har utløst bitter kommunekrangel". NRK Nordland (in Norwegian). Retrieved 2018-12-23.
  3. Frommer's Scandinavia article on Trollfjord