Trollkjelpiggen Peak

Last updated

Trollkjelpiggen Peak ( 71°35′S1°9′W / 71.583°S 1.150°W / -71.583; -1.150 Coordinates: 71°35′S1°9′W / 71.583°S 1.150°W / -71.583; -1.150 ) is a peak 5 nautical miles (9 km) southwest of Utkikken Hill, on the east side of Ahlmann Ridge in Queen Maud Land. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by Norwegian-British-Swedish Antarctic Expedition (NBSAE) (1949–52) and air photos by the Norwegian expedition (1958–59) and named Trollkjelpiggen (peak of the troll's cauldron).

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Utkikken Hill is the northeasternmost rock summit on the Ahlmann Ridge, standing 4 nautical miles (7 km) northeast of Trollkjelpiggen Peak where it overlooks the mouth of Jutulstraumen Glacier and the coastal ice shelf, in Queen Maud Land. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by Norwegian-British-Swedish Antarctic Expedition (NBSAE) (1949–52) and air photos by the Norwegian expedition (1958–59) and named Utkikken.

Ahlmann Ridge, also known as Ahlmannryggen, is a broad, mainly ice-covered ridge, about 110 km (70 mi) long, surmounted by scattered, low peaks. It rises between Schytt Glacier and Jutulstraumen Glacier and extends from Borg Massif northward to Fimbul Ice Shelf in Queen Maud Land. The area was first photographed from aircraft of the Third German Antarctic Expedition (1938–39) and peaks in this vicinity were roughly plotted. The Stein Nunataks and Witte Peaks, named by the German Antarctic Expedition, appear to coincide with the northeast part of the Ahlmann Ridge. The feature was mapped in detail from surveys and air photos by the Norwegian-British-Swedish Antarctic Expedition (NBSAE) (1949–1952) and air photos by the Norwegian expedition (1958–59). Named for Hans Wilhelmsson Ahlmann, chairman of the Swedish committee for the NBSAE.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Trollkjelpiggen Peak" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


Related Research Articles

Taborovskiy Peak is the highest peak, at 2,895 m, in the Skarshaugane Peaks of the Betekhtin Range, Humboldt Mountains, in Queen Maud Land. It was discovered and plotted from air photos by German Antarctic Expedition, 1938-39. The peak was mapped from air photos and surveys by Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60; remapped by Soviet Antarctic Expedition, 1960–61, and named after Soviet meteorologist N.L. Taborovskiy.

Isfossnipa Peak is a peak 2 miles (3 km) southeast of Austvorren Ridge, surmounting the eastern part of the Neumayer Cliffs in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. It was photographed from the air by the Third German Antarctic Expedition (1938–39). It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by the Norwegian–British–Swedish Antarctic Expedition (1949–1952), led by John Schjelderup Giæver, and from air photos by the Norwegian expedition (1958–59) and named "Isfossnipa".

Jutulstraumen Glacier is a large glacier in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica, about 120 nautical miles (220 km) long, draining northward to the Fimbul Ice Shelf between the Kirwan Escarpment, Borg Massif and Ahlmann Ridge on the west and the Sverdrup Mountains on the east. It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by the Norwegian–British–Swedish Antarctic Expedition (1949–52) and air photos by the Norwegian expedition (1958–59) and named Jutulstraumen. More specifically jutulen are troll-like figures from Norwegian folk tales. The ice stream reaches speeds of around 4 metres per day near the coast where it is heavily crevassed.

Belgen Valley is a broad, ice-filled valley between Enden Point and Heksegryta Peaks in the Kirwan Escarpment, Queen Maud Land. It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and from air photos by the Norwegian-British-Swedish Antarctic Expedition (1949–52) and from additional air photos (1958–59), and named "Belgen".

Brautnuten Peak is a low peak 5 nautical miles (9 km) southeast of Snøkallen Hill, on the east side of Ahlmann Ridge in Queen Maud Land. It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by the Norwegian–British–Swedish Antarctic Expedition (1949–52) and from air photos by the Norwegian expedition (1958–59) and named by the Norwegians.

Bystrov Rock is a prominent rock lying 1 nautical mile (2 km) south-southeast of Isdalsegga Ridge in the Südliche Petermann Range of the Wohlthat Mountains. It was mapped from air photos and surveys by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60; remapped by the Soviet Antarctic Expedition, 1960–61, and named after Soviet paleontologist A.P. Bystrov.

Vorrtind Peak is a peak at the north end of Austvorren Ridge, just north of Neumayer Cliffs in Queen Maud Land. Photographed from the air by the German Antarctic Expedition (1938–39). Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by Norwegian-British-Swedish Antarctic Expedition (NBSAE) (1949–52) and air photos by the Norwegian expedition (1958–59) and named Vorrtind.

Svarthornbotnen Cirque is a large cirque just northeast of Store Svarthorn Peak in the Mittlere Petermann Range, Wohlthat Mountains. Discovered and plotted from air photos by German Antarctic Expedition, 1938-39. Replotted by Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60, and named Svarthornbotnen.

The Jutulpløgsla Crevasses form a crevasse field halfway up Jutulstraumen Glacier, about 8 nautical miles (15 km) southeast of Nashornet Mountain, in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. They were mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by the Norwegian–British–Swedish Antarctic Expedition (1949–52) and from air photos by the Norwegian expedition (1958–59) and named Jutulpløgsla.

Mount Kropotkin is a peak on the west side of Jøkulkyrkja Mountain in the Mühlig-Hofmann Mountains of Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by the Norsk Polarinstitutt from surveys and air photos by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60. The peak was also mapped by the Soviet Antarctic Expedition in 1961 and named for Russian anarchist Peter Kropotkin.

Krakken Mountain is a mountain 1 nautical mile (2 km) north of Sandseten Mountain and just northwest of Gneysovaya Peak in the Westliche Petermann Range of the Wohlthat Mountains, Antarctica. It was discovered and plotted from air photos by the Third German Antarctic Expedition, 1938–39, was replotted from air photos and surveys by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60, and named Krakken.

Peter Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Peter Glacier is a short, broad glacier draining northeast into Jutulstraumen Glacier just east of Neumayer Cliffs and Melleby Peak in Queen Maud Land. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by Norwegian-British-Swedish Antarctic Expedition (NBSAE) (1949–52) and air photos by the Norwegian expedition (1958–59). Named for Peter Melleby who was in charge of sledge dogs with the NBSAE.

Mount Hansen is a mountain, 1,895 metres (6,220 ft) high, standing 1 nautical mile (2 km) north of Kare Bench and just northwest of Daykovaya Peak at the northern extremity of the Westliche Petermann Range, in the Wohlthat Mountains of Antarctica. It was discovered and plotted from air photos by the Third German Antarctic Expedition, 1938–39. It was replotted from air photos and surveys by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60, and named for Kare Hansen, a meteorologist with the Norwegian expedition, 1958–59.

Hette Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Hette Glacier is a glacier, 6 nautical miles (11 km) long, flowing north between the Hettene Nunataks and Austhamaren Peak in the Sør Rondane Mountains of Antarctica. It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers in 1957 from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, 1946–47, and named Hettebreen.

Sandseten Mountain is a flattish mountain 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) south of Krakken Mountain and just southwest of Gneysovaya Peak in Westliche Petermann Range, Wohlthat Mountains. Discovered and plotted from air photos by German Antarctic Expedition, 1938-39. Replotted from air photos and surveys by Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60, and named Sandseten.

Sjøneset Spur is a prominent rock spur from the Gruber Mountains, extending north along the east side of Anuchin Glacier to Lake Ober-See, in the Wohlthat Mountains of Queen Maud Land. It was discovered and plotted from air photos by the German Antarctic Expedition of 1938-39, and replotted from air photos and surveys by the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60, and named Sjøneset.

Skeidsnutane Peaks is a group of peaks, including Hånuten Peak, that extend south for about 6 nautical miles (11 km) from Skarshaugane Peaks, in the Humboldt Mountains of Queen Maud Land. Discovered and photographed by the German Antarctic Expedition, 1938-39. Mapped by Norway from air photos and surveys by Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60, and named Skeidsnutane.

Snøkjerringa Hill is a hill 3 nautical miles (5.6 km) naunorth-northwest of Snøkallen Hill, on the east side of Ahlmann Ridge in Queen Maud Land. It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by the Norwegian-British-Swedish Antarctic Expedition (1949–52) and named Snøkjerringa.

Mount Rukhin is a small mountain, 1,740 m, standing 9 nautical miles (17 km) southwest of Ekho Mountain in the Lomonosov Mountains, Queen Maud Land. Mapped from air photos by Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1958–59; remapped by Soviet Antarctic Expedition, 1960–61, and named after L.B. Rukhin, professor at Leningrad State University, who died in 1959.