Tropheops novemfasciatus

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Tropheops novemfasciatus
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Cichliformes
Family: Cichlidae
Genus: Tropheops
Species:
T. novemfasciatus
Binomial name
Tropheops novemfasciatus
Regan, 1922
Synonyms
  • Pseudotropheus novemfasciatusRegan, 1922

Tropheops novemfasciatus is a species of cichlid endemic to Lake Malawi where it prefers sheltered bays with rocks and vegetation, usually within 4 metres (13 ft) of the surface. This species can reach a length of 9 centimetres (3.5 in) SL. It can also be found in the aquarium trade. [2]

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References

  1. Konings, A.; Kazembe, J. (2018). "Tropheops novemfasciatus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . 2018: e.T61159A148675214. doi: 10.2305/IUCN.UK.2018-2.RLTS.T61159A148675214.en . Retrieved 15 November 2021.
  2. Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2013). "Tropheops novemfasciatus" in FishBase . April 2013 version.