Tropical Cyclone Evan

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The name Evan has been used to name tropical cyclones 3 times, once within the Australian region and twice within the South Pacific basin.

Australian region
South Pacific
Cyclone Evan Category 4 South Pacific cyclone in 2012

Severe Tropical Cyclone Evan was considered to be the worst tropical cyclone to affect the island nation of Samoa since Cyclone Val in 1991. The system was first noted on December 9, 2012, as a weak tropical depression about 700 km (435 mi) to the northeast of Suva, Fiji. Over the next couple of days the depression gradually developed further before it was named Evan on December 12, as it had developed into a tropical cyclone. During that day the system moved toward the Samoan Islands and gradually intensified, before the system slowed down and severely affected the Samoan Islands during the next day with wind gusts of up to 210 km/h (130 mph).

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