Tropical Storm Andrea

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The name Andrea has been used for two tropical cyclones and two subtropical cyclones worldwide.

In the Atlantic Ocean:

In the Indian Ocean:

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Subtropical cyclone Cyclonic storm with both tropical and extratropical characteristics

A subtropical cyclone is a weather system that has some characteristics of both tropical and an extratropical cyclone.

1978 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 1978 Atlantic hurricane season was the last Atlantic hurricane season to use an all-female naming list. The season officially began on June 1, and ended on November 30. It was an above average season due to a subsiding El Niño. The first storm, a subtropical storm, developed unusually early – on January 18 – and dissipated five days later without causing any damage. At the end of July and early August, short-lived Tropical Storm Amelia caused extensive flooding in Texas after dropping as much as 48 in (1,200 mm) of rain. There were 33 deaths and US$110 million in damage. Tropical Storm Bess and Hurricane Cora resulted in only minor land impacts, while the latter was attributed to one fatality.

The name Charley or Charlie has been used for eight tropical cyclones and one subtropical cyclone in the Atlantic Ocean, and for one tropical cyclone in the Australian region of the South Pacific Ocean.

The name Frances has been used for eight tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean and for one in the Australian region.

The name Gabrielle has been used for eight tropical cyclones worldwide, six in the Atlantic Ocean and two in the Indian Ocean.

The name Beryl has been used for seven tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean and for one in the South-West Indian Ocean.

The name Gilda has been used for three tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean, nine in the western Pacific Ocean, and one in the southwest Indian Ocean.

The name Rebecca, or the alternate spelling of the name, Rebekah, has been used for four tropical or Subtropical cyclones worldwide.

2007 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 2007 Atlantic hurricane season was the first season since 2003 to record tropical activity before and after the official bounds of the season. With 15 named storms, it was an above-average season, however many storms were weak and short-lived. Despite the high activity of weak storms during 2007, it was the first season to feature more than one Category 5 landfalling hurricane, a feat that would not be matched until ten years later. It produced 17 tropical cyclones, 15 tropical storms, six hurricanes, and two major hurricanes. It officially started on June 1 and ended on November 30, dates which conventionally delimit the period during which most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic Ocean, although as shown by Subtropical Storm Andrea and Tropical Storm Olga in early May and early December, respectively, the formation of tropical cyclones is possible at any time of the year. The first system, Subtropical Storm Andrea, developed on May 9, while the last storm, Tropical Storm Olga, dissipated on December 13. The most intense hurricane, Dean, is tied for the eighth most intense Atlantic hurricane ever recorded as well as the fourth most intense Atlantic hurricane at landfall. The season was one of only seven on record for the Atlantic with more than one Category 5 hurricane. It was the second on record in which an Atlantic hurricane, Felix, and an eastern Pacific hurricane, Henriette, made landfall on the same day. September had a then record-tying eight storms, until it was surpassed in 2020. However, the strengths and durations of most of the storms were low.

The name Alpha or Alfa has been used for three subtropical cyclones and one tropical storm in the Atlantic Ocean:

Subtropical Storm Andrea (2007) Atlantic subtropical storm in 2007

Subtropical Storm Andrea was the first named storm to form in May in the Atlantic Ocean in 26 years. Andrea caused large waves and tropical-storm force winds along the southeast coast of the United States. The first named storm and the first subtropical cyclone of the 2007 Atlantic hurricane season, Andrea developed out of a non-tropical low on May 9 about 150 miles (240 km) northeast of Daytona Beach, Florida, three weeks before the official start of the season. After encountering dry air and strong vertical wind shear, Andrea weakened to a subtropical depression on May 10 while remaining nearly stationary, and the National Hurricane Center discontinued advisories early on May 11. Andrea's remnant was subsequently absorbed into another extratropical storm on May 14. Andrea was the first pre-season storm to develop since Tropical Storm Ana in April 2003. Additionally, the storm was the first Atlantic named storm in May since Tropical Storm Arlene in 1981.

Timeline of the 2007 Atlantic hurricane season

The 2007 Atlantic hurricane season was an event in the annual tropical cyclone season in the north Atlantic Ocean. A slightly above-average Atlantic hurricane season, September had a record-tying eight storms, although the strength and duration of most of the storms was low. Also, for only the second time in recorded history, an Atlantic hurricane, Felix, and an eastern Pacific hurricane, Henriette, made landfall on the same day.

Timeline of the 1974 Atlantic hurricane season

The 1974 Atlantic hurricane season was an event in the annual tropical cyclone season in the north Atlantic Ocean. There was near-average activity during the season, which officially began on June 1, 1974 and ended on November 30, 1974. These dates, adopted by convention, historically describe the period in each year when most tropical systems form. The first system of the season, Tropical Depression One, formed on June 22. The final system of the season, Tropical Depression Seventeen, dissipated on November 11.

2013 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 2013 Atlantic hurricane season was a well below average Atlantic hurricane season and the first since 1994 with no major hurricanes. It was well below average for both hurricanes and major hurricanes but it was a slightly above average year for named storms. It was also the first season in the satellite era with no storms of at least Category 2 intensity on the Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale. The first tropical cyclone of the season, Andrea, developed on June 5, while the final cyclone, an unnamed subtropical storm, dissipated on December 7. Throughout the year, only two storms—Humberto and Ingrid—reached hurricane intensity; this was the lowest seasonal total since 1982.

The name Colin has been used for two tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean and two in the Southern Hemisphere.

2019 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 2019 Atlantic hurricane season was the fourth consecutive above-average and damaging season dating back to 2016. However, many were weak and short-lived, especially towards the end of the season. Six of those named storms achieved hurricane status, while three intensified into major hurricanes. Two storms became Category 5 hurricanes, marking the fourth consecutive season with at least one Category 5 hurricane, the third consecutive season to feature at least one storm making landfall at Category 5 intensity, and the seventh on record to have multiple tropical cyclones reaching Category 5 strength. The season officially began on June 1 and ended on November 30. These dates historically describe the period each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin and are adopted by convention. However, tropical cyclogenesis is possible at any time of the year, as demonstrated by the formation of Subtropical Storm Andrea on May 20, marking the record fifth consecutive year where a tropical or subtropical cyclone developed before the official start of the season.

Timeline of the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season

The 2013 Atlantic hurricane season was an event in the annual hurricane season in the north Atlantic Ocean. It featured below-average tropical cyclone activity, with the fewest hurricanes since the 1982 season. The season officially began on June 1, 2013 and ended on November 30, 2013. These dates, adopted by convention, historically delimit the period in each year when most tropical systems form. The season's first storm, Tropical Storm Andrea formed on June 5, and its final storm, an unnamed subtropical storm, dissipated on December 7. Altogether, there were 13 named tropical storms during the season. Two of which attained hurricane strength, but neither intensified into a major hurricane, the first such occurrence since the 1994 season.