Tropical Storm Arthur

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The name Arthur has been used for seven tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean.

Arthur has been used for three tropical cyclones in the Southern Hemisphere.

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The name Alex has been used for a total of 11 tropical cyclones worldwide: Four in the Atlantic Ocean, four in the West Pacific Ocean and three in the South Indian Ocean.

The name Bonnie has been used for seven tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean:

The name Charley or Charlie was used for eight tropical cyclones and one subtropical cyclone in the Atlantic Ocean.

1952 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 1952 Atlantic hurricane season was the last Atlantic hurricane season in which tropical cyclones were named using the Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet. It was a near normal Atlantic hurricane season, although it was the least active since 1946. The season officially started on June 15; however, a pre-season unnamed storm formed on Groundhog Day, becoming the only storm on record in the month of February. The other six tropical cyclones were named using the Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet, the first of which formed on August 18. The final storm of the season dissipated on October 28, two and a half weeks before the season officially ended on November 15.

The name Barry has been used for seven tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean.

The name Gabrielle has been used for six tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean; Gabrielle is one of the original names on the rotating six-year cycle of names used in the North Atlantic basin established in 1979.

The name Cindy has been used for nine tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean.

1984 Pacific hurricane season

The 1984 Pacific hurricane season was a very active season, producing 21 named storms. When Fausto became a tropical storm on July 3, it was the earliest the sixth-named storm on record at the time. This record would be tied in 1985 and broken 34 years later. The season produced 26 tropical cyclones, of which 21 developed into named storms; 13 cyclones attained hurricane status, of which three reached major hurricane status. The season officially started on May 15, 1984, in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1984, in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1984. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when the vast majority tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The strongest hurricane of the season was Hurricane Douglas, which attained Category 4 status on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale in the open Pacific.

The name Barbara has been used for two tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean, seven tropical cyclones in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, one tropical cyclone in the Western Pacific Ocean, two tropical cyclones in the Southwest Indian Ocean, and one tropical cyclone in the South Pacific Ocean. The name has also been used once in the UK and Ireland's windstorm naming system.

1993 Pacific typhoon season Typhoon season in the Pacific Ocean

The 1993 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1993, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

1887 Atlantic hurricane season

The 1887 Atlantic hurricane season was the most active Atlantic hurricane season on record at the time. As of the 2020 season it is tied with 1995, 2010, 2011 and 2012, for the fourth-most active Atlantic hurricane season, with 19 tropical storms. 1887 also featured five off-season storms, with tropical activity occurring as early as May, and as late as December. Tropical cyclones that did not approach populated areas or shipping lanes, especially if they were relatively weak and of short duration, may have remained undetected. Because technologies such as satellite monitoring were not available until the 1960s, historical data on tropical cyclones from this period may not be comprehensive. An undercount bias of zero to six tropical cyclones per year between 1851 and 1885 and zero to four per year between 1886 and 1910 has been estimated. Of the known 1887 cyclones, Tropical Storm One and Tropical Storm Three were first documented in 1996 by Jose Fernandez-Partagas and Henry Diaz. They also proposed large alterations to the known tracks of several of the other 1887 storms. Later re-analysis led to the known duration of Hurricane Six, and also that of Hurricane Fifteen, being increased.

1984–85 Australian region cyclone season

The 1984–85 Australian region cyclone season was one of the most active seasons on record. It officially started on 1 November 1984, and officially ended on 30 April 1985.