Tropical Storm Bret (2005)

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Tropical Storm Bret
Tropical storm (SSHWS/NWS)
Tsbret2005.jpg
Tropical Storm Bret at peak intensity and approaching Veracruz on June 28
FormedJune 28, 2005
DissipatedJune 30, 2005
Highest winds 1-minute sustained: 40 mph (65 km/h)
Lowest pressure1002 mbar (hPa); 29.59 inHg
Fatalities2 total
Damage$9.3 million (2005 USD)
Areas affectedEastern Mexico
Part of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season

Tropical Storm Bret was a short-lived tropical storm of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season that made landfall in the Mexican state of Veracruz, the first of four during the season. The second named storm of the season, Bret developed along a tropical wave on June 28 in the Bay of Campeche, and quickly intensified. Tracking to the west-northwest, Bret moved ashore within 24 hours of forming, and dissipated shortly thereafter.

Contents

Bret was the first of six tropical cyclones (three hurricanes, two of them major, and three tropical storms) to make landfall in Mexico during the season. With the formation of the tropical storm on June 28, the 2005 season became the first since 1986 with two storms in the month of June. [1] The storm dropped heavy rainfall along its path, peaking at 266 mm (10.67 inches). About 7,500 people were affected, and damage was estimated at 100 million pesos (2005  MXN, US$9.3 million). Two people died related to the storm.

Meteorological history

Map plotting the track and the intensity of the storm, according to the Saffir-Simpson scale Bret 2005 track.png
Map plotting the track and the intensity of the storm, according to the Saffir–Simpson scale

A tropical wave accompanied by a weak surface low-pressure area crossed Central America and eastern Mexico from June 24 through June 27. An area of disturbed weather associated with the system moved into the Bay of Campeche early on June 28, [2] though initially unfavorable upper-level wind shear and land interaction limited initial development. [3] It tracked west-northwestward at 8–16 km/h (5–10 mph), [4] and after moving into open waters the organization of deep convection increased with curved banding features developing. Based on data from a hurricane hunters flight into the system, it is estimated it developed into Tropical Depression Two at 18:00  UTC on June 28, while located about 100 km (62 mi) northeast of the city of Veracruz. At the time of its first advisory, the government of Mexico issued a tropical storm warning from Veracruz to Tampico. [2]

About four hours after formation, the depression intensified into Tropical Storm Bret, upon which it attained a minimum central pressure of 1002  mbar. [2] Shortly thereafter, its appearance on radar deteriorated, and convection warmed around the center. With a mid-level anticyclone over Texas, Bret tracked steadily to the west-northwest, [5] and began to re-organize just before moving ashore; at 12:00 UTC on June 29, the storm made landfall just southeast of Tuxpan with winds of 65 km/h (40 mph). [2] After crossing the coast, the storm quickly degenerated to tropical depression status, though Bret retained a well-organized cloud pattern with deep convection. [6] The center turned to the north-northwest, and early on June 30 Bret dissipated inland over Mexico. [2]

Impact

Tropical Storm Bret produced heavy rainfall along its path, with a peak 24‑hour rainfall total of 266 mm (10.47 inches) recorded in El Raudal, Veracruz; [7] several other locations reported over 4 inches (100 mm) of precipitation. The rainfall caused widespread flooding in Veracruz, [2] especially in the city of Naranjos where an overflown river flooded portions of the city with 2 m (7 ft) of water. [8] Bret killed two people in Mexico one in Naranjos and the other in Cerro Azul. [9] [8]

The damage total from Bret was estimated at 100 million pesos (2005 MXN, US$9.3 million). [9] Shortly after the passage of the storm, the government of Veracruz opened 6,000 emergency storm shelters for impacted citizens. Floodwaters from the rainfall inundated scores of houses and cars, [8] forcing 2,800 people to evacuate, [9] and affecting 7,500 families in Veracruz. [10] The Mexican Army, combined with the efforts of police officers and state officials, worked with amphibious vehicles to rescue families in flooded houses, of whom many waited on rooftops. Landslides from the flooding cut communications and left 66 villages temporarily isolated. [8] Across Veracruz, the most affected localities were Naranjos, Chinampa de Gorostiza, Tamalín, Tantima, Benito Juárez, Tamiahua, and Tempoal de Sánchez. The government of Veracruz declared a state of emergency for 14 municipalities. Damage in the state totaled over 100 million pesos (2005  MXN, US$9.3 million); the state government requested 100 million pesos (2005  MXN, US$9.3 million) in reconstruction aid. [10]

See also

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References

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