Tropical Storm Cosme

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The name Cosme has been used for seven tropical cyclones in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

Hurricane Cosme (1989) Category 1 Pacific hurricane in 1989

Hurricane Cosme was an unusually large tropical cyclone that made landfall in south-western Mexico in June 1989. The third tropical storm and second hurricane of the 1989 Pacific hurricane season, Cosme formed on June 19 from a tropical wave, the storm initially moved westward before being upgraded into Tropical Storm Cosme. It ultimately intensifying into a Category 1 hurricane. Cosme turned northward and made landfall near Acapulco during the night of June 21. It rapidly weakened over land. The storm caused excessive rainfall on land, leading to deadly and destructive flooding. It is estimated that 30 people died in the hurricane.

Hurricane Cosme (2007) Category 1 Pacific hurricane in 2007

Hurricane Cosme was a minimal hurricane that threatened Hawaii in mid-July 2007. The sixth tropical cyclone, third named storm and first hurricane of the 2007 Pacific hurricane season, Cosme originated from a tropical wave that emerged off the coast of Africa on June 27 and tracked westward before emerging in the eastern Pacific. A system along the wave organized, and it was classified as a tropical depression on July 14, a tropical storm on July 15, and a hurricane on July 16. Cosme reached peak intensity as a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, but quickly weakened due to cooler waters. Steadily decreasing in strength, the storm was downgraded to a tropical depression before passing to the south of the Hawaiian Islands. The depression crossed into the Central Pacific and degenerated into a remnant low by July 23.

Hurricane Cosme (2013)

Hurricane Cosme caused flooding along the Pacific coast of Mexico in June 2013. The third named tropical cyclone of the 2013 Pacific hurricane season, the storm system formed from a tropical wave south of Manzanillo, Colima, on June 23. The cyclone intensified into a tropical storm on June 24, and soon after strengthened into a hurricane on June 25. Early the following day, Cosme attained its peak intensity as a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir–Simpson scale with maximum sustained winds of 85 mph (140 km/h) and a minimum barometric pressure of 980 mbar. However, Cosme then began to encounter stable air and lower sea surface temperatures, causing the system to weaken to a tropical storm late on June 26. The system continued to weaken and degenerated into a remnant low pressure surface trough about 690 mi (1,110 km) west-southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, on June 27. The remnants persisted until dissipating well east-southeast of the Hawaiian Islands on July 1.

The name Cosme has been used for two tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific.

Typhoon Sudal Pacific typhoon in 2004

Typhoon Sudal, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Cosme, was the strongest typhoon to strike the island of Yap in the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) in about 50 years. Yap is one of the four administrative divisions of the FSM. The entire island, only 17 km (11 mi) in length, experienced typhoon force winds, and 90% of the structures were damaged or destroyed. Damage was most severe in southeastern Yap, where the eyewall struck and winds exceeded 185 km/h (115 mph), but the center of the typhoon passed south of the island.

Tropical Storm Halong (2008) Pacific severe tropical storm in 2008

Severe Tropical Storm Halong, known in the Philippines as Severe Tropical Storm Cosme, was the fourth severe tropical storm named by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) who are the Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre for the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center also recognised Halong as the fifth tropical depression, the fourth tropical storm as well as the third typhoon of the 2008 Pacific typhoon season.

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