Tropical Storm Gabrielle

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The name Gabrielle has been used for eight tropical cyclones worldwide, six in the Atlantic Ocean and two in the Indian Ocean.

In the Atlantic:

In the Indian:

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2002 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 2002 Atlantic hurricane season was a near-average Atlantic hurricane season. It officially started on June 1, 2002 and ended on November 30, dates which conventionally limit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones develop in the Atlantic Ocean. The season produced fourteen tropical cyclones, of which twelve developed into named storms; four became hurricanes, and two attained major hurricane status. While the season's first cyclone did not develop until July 14, activity quickly picked up: eight storms developed in the month of September. It ended early however, with no tropical storms forming after October 6—a rare occurrence caused partly by El Niño conditions. The most intense hurricane of the season was Hurricane Isidore with a minimum central pressure of 934 mbar, although Hurricane Lili attained higher winds and peaked at Category 4 whereas Isidore only reached Category 3.

1968 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 1968 Atlantic hurricane season was one of five Atlantic hurricane seasons during the satellite era not to feature a major hurricane, the others being 1972, 1986, 1994, and 2013, and was one of two to not feature a category 2 hurricane either, with the other being 2013. The season officially began on June 1 and lasted until November 30, dates which conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. It was a below average season in terms of tropical storms, with a total of eight nameable storms. The first system, Hurricane Abby, developed in the northwestern Caribbean on June 1. Abby moved northward and struck Cuba, bringing heavy rainfall and flooding to western portions of the island. Making landfall in Florida on June 4, Abby caused flooding and spawned four tornadoes, but left behind little damage. Overall, the hurricane resulted in six deaths and about $450,000 (1968 USD) in damage. In late June, Tropical Storm Candy brought minor flooding and spawned several tornadoes across portions of the Southern United States. Overall damage from the cyclone reached approximately $2.7 million.

1983 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 1983 Atlantic hurricane season was the least active Atlantic hurricane season since 1930. The season officially began on June 1, 1983, and lasted until November 30, 1983. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most storms form in the Atlantic basin. The season had very little activity, with only seven tropical depressions, four of which reached tropical storm strength or higher. This led to the lowest accumulated cyclone energy count since 1977, but not since 1914.

1989 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 1989 Atlantic hurricane season was an average season with 11 named storms. The season officially began on June 1, and ended on November 30. The first storm, Tropical Depression One, developed on June 15, and dissipated two days later without effects on land. Later that month, Tropical Storm Allison caused severe flooding, especially in Texas and Louisiana. Tropical Storm Barry, Tropical Depressions Six, Nine, and Thirteen, and Hurricanes Erin and Felix caused negligible impact. Hurricane Gabrielle and Tropical Storm Iris caused light effects on land, with the former resulting in nine fatalities from rip currents offshore the East Coast of the United States and Atlantic Canada, while the latter produced minor flooding in the United States Virgin Islands.

1936 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 1936 Atlantic hurricane season was fairly active, with 20 tropical cyclones recorded, 17 of which became tropical storms. Seven storms became hurricanes, of which one became a major hurricane. In addition, the season was unusual in the fact that no storms moved across large portions of the Caribbean Sea. Seven storms, including three hurricanes, struck the United States.

The name Claudette has been used for eight tropical cyclones in the Northern Atlantic Ocean:

The name Bertha has been used for eight tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean.

The name Cindy has been used for nine tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean.

1997 Pacific hurricane season Hurricane season in the Pacific Ocean

The 1997 Pacific hurricane season was a very active hurricane season. With hundreds of deaths and hundreds of millions of dollars in damage, this season was one of the costliest and deadliest Pacific hurricane seasons. This was due to the exceptionally strong 1997–98 El Niño event. The 1997 Pacific hurricane season officially started on May 15, 1997, in the eastern Pacific, and on June 1, 1997, in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1997. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when almost all tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean.

1996 Pacific hurricane season Hurricane season in the Pacific Ocean

The 1996 Pacific hurricane season saw a record four Pacific hurricanes strike Mexico. It was a below average season that produced 9 tropical storms, 5 hurricanes and 2 major hurricanes. It officially began May 15, 1996, in the eastern north Pacific and on June 1, 1996, in the central north Pacific. It ended on November 30, 1996. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The season slightly exceeded these bounds when tropical storm One-E formed on May 13.

2007 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 2007 Atlantic hurricane season was a slightly above-average season, featuring many weak and short-lived storms. Despite the high activity of weak storms during 2007, it was the first season to feature more than one Category 5 landfalling hurricane, a feat that would not be matched until ten years later. It produced 17 tropical cyclones, 15 tropical storms, six hurricanes, and two major hurricanes. It officially started on June 1 and ended on November 30, dates which conventionally delimit the period during which most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic Ocean, although as shown by Subtropical Storm Andrea and Tropical Storm Olga in early May and early December, respectively, the formation of tropical cyclones is possible at any time of the year. The first system, Subtropical Storm Andrea, developed on May 9, while the last storm, Tropical Storm Olga, dissipated on December 13. The most intense hurricane, Dean, is tied for the eighth most intense Atlantic hurricane ever recorded as well as the fourth most intense Atlantic hurricane at landfall. The season was one of only seven on record for the Atlantic with more than one Category 5 hurricane. It was the second on record in which an Atlantic hurricane, Felix, and an eastern Pacific hurricane, Henriette, made landfall on the same day. September had a then record-tying eight storms, until it was surpassed in 2020. However, the strengths and durations of most of the storms were low.

1979 Pacific typhoon season Period of formation of tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific Ocean in 1979

The 1979 Pacific typhoon season featured the most intense tropical cyclone recorded globally, Typhoon Tip. The season also experienced slightly above-average tropical cyclone activity. The season had no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1979, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

1971 Pacific hurricane season Hurricane season in the Pacific Ocean

The 1971 Pacific hurricane season began on May 15, 1971, in the east Pacific, and on June 1, 1971, in the central Pacific. It ended on November 30, 1971. These dates conventionally delimit the period of time when tropical cyclones form in the east Pacific Ocean.

The name Chantal has been used for eight tropical cyclones worldwide: seven in the Atlantic Ocean and one in the South-West Indian Ocean.

Tropical cyclones in 2020 Tropical cyclones by year

During 2020, tropical cyclones formed within seven different tropical cyclone basins, located within various parts of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. During the year, 141 tropical cyclones formed in bodies of water known as tropical cyclone basins. Of these, 104, including three subtropical cyclones in the South Atlantic Ocean and three tropical-like cyclones in the Mediterranean, were named by various weather agencies when they attained maximum sustained winds of 35 knots. The strongest storm of the year was Yasa, peaking with a pressure of 899 hPa (26.55 inHg) and with 10-minute sustained winds of 250 km/h (155 mph). The deadliest storm of the year was Eta which caused 175 fatalities and another 100+ to be missing in Central America and the US, while the costliest storm of the year was Laura, with a damage cost around $19.1 billion in the Greater Antilles, The Bahamas, and the Gulf Coast of the United States.

Tropical cyclones in 1993 Tropical cyclone year

During 1993, tropical cyclones foed within seven different bodies of water called basins. To date, 110 tropical cyclones formed, of which 78 were given names by various weather agencies.

Tropical cyclones in 2021 Tropical cyclone year

In 2021, tropical cyclones have formed in six major bodies of water, commonly known as tropical cyclone basins. Tropical cyclones will be assigned names by various weather agencies if they attain maximum sustained winds of 35 knots. During this year, 131 systems have formed and 81 were named, including one subtropical depression and excluding one system, which was unofficial. One storm was given two names by the same RSMC. So far, the most intense storm of the year was Typhoon Surigae, with maximum 10-minute sustained wind speeds of 220 km/h (140 mph) and a minimum pressure of 895 hPa (26.43 inHg). The deadliest tropical cyclone so far was Cyclone Seroja, which caused 272 fatalities in Indonesia, while the costliest so far was Hurricane Ida, which caused an estimated $65.25 billion USD in damage after striking Louisiana and the Northeastern United States.