Tropical Storm Ilsa

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The name Ilsa has been used for six tropical cyclones worldwide, one in the Atlantic Ocean, three in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and two in the Australian region of the Indian Ocean.

In the Atlantic:

In the Eastern Pacific:

In the Australian region:

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The name Fay or Faye has been used for 22 tropical cyclones worldwide: 5 in the Atlantic Ocean; 1 in the Australian region; 1 in the South Pacific Ocean; and 15 in the Western Pacific Ocean.

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Tropical cyclones in 2020 Tropical cyclones by year

During 2020, tropical cyclones formed within seven different tropical cyclone basins, located within various parts of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. During the year, 141 tropical cyclones formed in bodies of water known as tropical cyclone basins. Of these, 104, including three subtropical cyclones in the South Atlantic Ocean and three tropical-like cyclones in the Mediterranean, were named by various weather agencies when they attained maximum sustained winds of 35 knots. The strongest storm of the year was Goni, peaking with a pressure of 905 hPa (26.72 inHg) and with 10-minute sustained winds of 220 km/h (140 mph). The deadliest storm of the year was Eta which caused 175 fatalities and another 100+ to be missing in Central America and the US, while the costliest storm of the year was Laura, with a damage cost around $19.1 billion in the Greater Antilles, The Bahamas, and the Gulf Coast of the United States.

Tropical cyclones in 2004

During 2004, tropical cyclones formed within seven different tropical cyclone basins, located within various parts of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. During the year, a total of 132 systems formed with 82 of these developing further and were named by the responsible warning centre. The strongest tropical cyclone of the year was Cyclone Gafilo, which was estimated to have a minimum barometric pressure of 895 hPa (26.43 inHg).

Tropical cyclones in 1999 Tropical cyclone year

During 1999, tropical cyclones formed within seven different bodies of water called basins. To date, 142 tropical cyclones formed in bodies of water known as tropical cyclone basins, of which 72 were given names by various weather agencies. The strongest tropical cyclone of the year was Gwenda, attaining maximum sustained winds of 120 knots and a pressure of 900 hPa (26.58 inHg), later tied with Inigo in 2003. Floyd was the costliest tropical cyclone of the year, with around $6.5 billion worth of damages as it affected the Bahamas, the East Coast of the United States, and the Atlantic Canada. The deadliest cyclone of this year was the 1999 Odisha cyclone, which was blamed for over 9,667 deaths as it devastated India. It was also the strongest Northern Hemisphere cyclone of the year with the pressure of 912 hPa (26.93 inHg) and third most intense tropical cyclone worldwide next to Cyclone Gwenda and Cyclone Vance. Three Category 5 tropical cyclones were formed in 1999.