Tropical Storm Nell

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Tropical Storm Nell may refer to:

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The name Alex has been used for a total of 11 tropical cyclones worldwide: Four in the Atlantic Ocean, four in the West Pacific Ocean and three in the South Indian Ocean.

At sea, a storm warning is a warning issued by the National Weather Service of the United States when winds between 48 knots and 63 knots are occurring or predicted to occur soon. The winds must not be associated with a tropical cyclone. If the winds are associated with a tropical cyclone, a tropical storm warning will be substituted for the storm warning and less severe gale warning.

The name Iris was used for three tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean.

The name Gordon has been used for five tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean since 1988, when it replaced the name Gilbert on the list of hurricane names.

2005 Pacific typhoon season typhoon season in the Pacific Ocean

The 2005 Pacific typhoon season was the least active typhoon season since 2000, featuring only 24 tropical storms, 13 typhoons and three super typhoons. The season ran throughout 2005, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Kulap, developed on January 15, while the season's last named storm, Bolaven, dissipated on November 20.

The name Lee has been used for seven tropical cyclones worldwide. In the Atlantic, it replaced the name ‘’’Lenny’’’, from 1999.

The name Nina has been used for thirteen typhoons in the northwest Pacific Ocean, one tropical cyclone in the northeast Pacific Ocean, and one tropical cyclone in the southwest Pacific.

Pacific hurricane mature tropical cyclone that develops within the eastern and central Pacific Ocean

A Pacific hurricane is a mature tropical cyclone that develops within the eastern and central Pacific Ocean to the east of 180°W, north of the equator. For tropical cyclone warning purposes, the northern Pacific is divided into three regions: the eastern, central, and western, while the southern Pacific is divided into 2 sections, the Australian region and the southern Pacific basin between 160°E and 120°W. Identical phenomena in the western north Pacific are called typhoons. This separation between the two basins has a practical convenience, however, as tropical cyclones rarely form in the central north Pacific due to high vertical wind shear, and few cross the dateline.

The name Vera has been used for thirteen tropical cyclones in the northwest Pacific Ocean.

Tropical Storm Alice may refer to:

1964 Pacific typhoon season typhoon season in the Pacific Ocean

The 1964 Pacific typhoon season was the most active tropical cyclone season recorded globally, with a total of 40 tropical storms forming. It had no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1964, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

The name Emma has been used for nine tropical cyclones in the northwest Pacific Ocean.

The name Thelma has been used for thirteen tropical cyclones in the northwest Pacific Ocean.

Tropical cyclone Is a rotating storm system

A tropical cyclone is a rapidly rotating storm system characterized by a low-pressure center, a closed low-level atmospheric circulation, strong winds, and a spiral arrangement of thunderstorms that produce heavy rain. Depending on its location and strength, a tropical cyclone is referred to by different names, including hurricane, typhoon, tropical storm, cyclonic storm, tropical depression, and simply cyclone. A hurricane is a tropical cyclone that occurs in the Atlantic Ocean and northeastern Pacific Ocean, and a typhoon occurs in the northwestern Pacific Ocean; in the south Pacific or Indian Ocean, comparable storms are referred to simply as "tropical cyclones" or "severe cyclonic storms".

The name Helen has been used for eleven tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific Ocean.

2014 Pacific typhoon season typhoon season in the Pacific Ocean

The 2014 Pacific typhoon season was a slightly below average season, featuring 23 tropical storms, 11 typhoons, and 8 super typhoons. The season's peak months August and September saw minimal activity caused by an unusually strong and a persistent suppressing phase of the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO). The season ran throughout 2014, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season began with the development of Tropical Storm Lingling on January 18, and ended after Tropical Storm Jangmi which dissipated on January 1 of the next year.

2015 Pacific typhoon season typhoon season in the Pacific Ocean

The 2015 Pacific typhoon season was a slightly above average season that produced 27 tropical storms, 18 typhoons, and nine super typhoons. The season ran throughout 2015, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and November. The season's first named storm, Mekkhala, developed on January 15, while the season's last named storm, Melor, dissipated on December 17. The season saw at least one named tropical system forming in each of every month, the first time since 1965. Similar to the previous season, this season saw a high number of super typhoons. Accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) during 2015 was extremely high, the second highest since the 1970, and the 2015 ACE has been attributed in part to anthropogenic warming.

2017 Pacific typhoon season typhoon season in the Pacific Ocean

The 2017 Pacific typhoon season was a below-average season in terms of Accumulated Cyclone Energy and the number of typhoons and super typhoons, and the first and latest since the 1977 season to not produce a Category 5-equivalent typhoon on the Saffir-Simpson scale. The season produced a total of 27 named storms, 11 typhoons, and only two super typhoons, making it an average season in terms of storm numbers. It was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Ocean. The season runs throughout 2017, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Muifa, developed on April 25, while the season's last named storm, Tembin, dissipated on December 26. This season also featured the latest occurrence of the first typhoon of the year since 1998, with Noru reaching this intensity on July 23.

2018 Pacific typhoon season

The 2018 Pacific typhoon season was an above-average season producing 29 storms, 13 typhoons and 7 super typhoons. It was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Ocean. The season ran throughout 2018, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Bolaven, developed on January 3, while the season's last named storm, Man-yi, dissipated on November 28. The season's first typhoon, Jelawat, reached typhoon status on March 29, and became the first super typhoon of the year on the next day.

Typhoon Hagupit (2014)

Typhoon Hagupit, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Ruby, was the second most intense tropical cyclone in 2014. Hagupit particularly impacted the Philippines in early December while gradually weakening, killing 18 people and causing $114 million in the country. Prior to making landfall, Typhoon Hagupit was considered the worst threat to the Philippines in 2014, but it was significantly smaller than 2013's Typhoon Haiyan.