Tropidophis xanthogaster

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Guanahacabibes dwarf boa
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Order: Squamata
Suborder: Serpentes
Family: Tropidophiidae
Genus: Tropidophis
Species:
T. xanthogaster
Binomial name
Tropidophis xanthogaster

Guanahacabibes dwarf boa, Tropidophis xanthogaster, is a newly described species of dwarf boa endemic to the Guanahacabibes Peninsula, in the province of Pinar del Río, western Cuba. It is grayish-brown with eight rows of dark brown spots and yellow abdomen.

Related Research Articles

Tropidophiidae Family of snakes

The Tropidophiidae, common name dwarf boas or thunder snakes, are a family of nonvenomous snakes found from Mexico and the West Indies south to southeastern Brazil. These are small to medium-sized fossorial snakes, some with beautiful and striking color patterns. Currently, two living genera, containing 34 species, are recognized. Two other genera were once considered to be tropidophiids but are now known to be more closely related to boids, and are classified in the subfamily Ungaliophiinae. There are a relatively large number of fossil snakes that have been described as tropidophiids, but which of these are more closely related to Tropidophis and Trachyboa and which are more closely related to Ungaliophis and Exiliboa is unknown.

<i>Tropidophis melanurus</i> Species of snake

Tropidophis melanurus, commonly known as dusky dwarf boa, Cuban wood snake, or Cuban giant dwarf boa, is a non-venomous dwarf boa species found mainly in Cuba. Currently, there are three subspecies recognized, including the typical form described here.

Guanahacabibes Peninsula

Guanahacabibes Peninsula is the westernmost point on the island of Cuba. It is located in Pinar del Río Province, in the municipality of Sandino and is sparsely populated. The waters surrounding the peninsula are important spiny lobster and red snapper fishing grounds. It also boasts the category of Biosphere Reserve, listed by UNESCO in 1987. Its western extremity, Cape San Antonio, is the westernmost point of Cuba.

<i>Tropidophis</i> Genus of snakes

Tropidophis, common name wood snakes or West Indian wood snakes, is a genus of dwarf boas endemic to the West Indies and South America. Currently, 17 species are recognized.

Tropidophis fuscus is a non-venomous dwarf boa species found in Cuba. No subspecies are currently recognized.

Tropidophis celiae, commonly known as the Canasi dwarf boa or the Canasi trope, is a species of dwarf boa, a snake in the family Tropidophiidae.

Tropidophis spiritus, the Sancti Spiritus trope, is a small species of dwarf boa endemic to the province of Sancti Spíritus in central Cuba. It is distinguished from other Tropidophis species by its gracile body shape and color pattern of bold spots.

Tropidophis morenoi, commonly known as the zebra dwarf boa, is a species of snake in the family Tropidophiidae. The species is endemic to the West Indies.

Tropidophis hendersoni, commonly known as the Cuban khaki dwarf boa, is a species of dwarf boa endemic to the West Indies.

Guanahacabibes is a word of Taíno origin, and may refer to:

<i>Tropidophis feicki</i> Species of snake

Tropidophis feicki, also known as the broad-banded dwarf boa or Feick's dwarf boa, is a species of snake in the family Tropidophiidae. The species is endemic to Cuba.

Tropidophis maculatus, or the Spotted red dwarf boa, is a species of snake in the family Tropidophiidae. It is endemic to Cuba.

Tropidophis nigriventis, or the black-bellied dwarf boa, is a species of snake in the family Tropidophiidae. The species is endemic to Cuba.

Tropidophis pardalis, or the leopard dwarf boa or spotted brown trope, is a species of snake in the family Tropidophiidae. It is endemic to Cuba.

Tropidophis pilsbryi, commonly known as Pilsbry's dwarf boa or the Cuban white-necked dwarf boa, is a species of snake in the family Tropidophiidae. The species is endemic to Cuba.

<i>Tropidophis semicinctus</i> Species of snake

Tropidophis semicinctus, or the Yellow-banded dwarf boa, is a species of snake in the family Tropidophiidae. It is endemic to Cuba.

Tropidophis wrighti, commonly known as the gracile banded dwarf boa, the gracile banded trope, and Wright's dwarf boa, is a species of snake in the family Tropidophiidae. The species is endemic to Cuba.

Cabo Corrientes, Cuba

Cabo Corrientes is a cape on the Guanahacabibes Peninsula in Pinar del Río Province, in the west of Cuba. It is covered by a protected nature reserve. The cape has been the scene of various pirate encounters and shipwrecks. During World War II (1939–45) several ships were sunk near the cape. There is a hotel for researchers and ecotourists or scuba divers.

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