Trostletown Bridge

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Trostletown Bridge
Trostletown Bridge.JPG
Trostletown Bridge, July 2012
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LocationSoutheast of Stoystown off U.S. Route 30, Quemahoning Township, Pennsylvania
Coordinates 40°5′45″N78°56′44″W / 40.09583°N 78.94556°W / 40.09583; -78.94556 Coordinates: 40°5′45″N78°56′44″W / 40.09583°N 78.94556°W / 40.09583; -78.94556
Area0.1 acres (0.040 ha)
Built1845
Architectural styleKingpost truss
MPS Covered Bridges of Somerset County TR
NRHP reference No. 80003636 [1]
Added to NRHPDecember 11, 1980

The Trostletown Bridge is a historic covered bridge in Quemahoning Township, Somerset County, Pennsylvania. It was built in 1845, and is a 104-foot-long (32 m) Kingpost truss bridge, with half-height plank siding and an asbestos shingled gable roof. The bridge crosses Stony Creek. It is one of 10 covered bridges in Somerset County. [2]

It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. "National Historic Landmarks & National Register of Historic Places in Pennsylvania" (Searchable database). CRGIS: Cultural Resources Geographic Information System.Note: This includes Herb Berman and Susan M. Zacher (n.d.). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Covered Bridges of Somerset County Thematic Resources (Trostletown Bridge)" (PDF). Retrieved 2011-12-08.