Trout Creek (Monument Creek tributary)

Last updated
Trout Creek
Location
Physical characteristics
Source 
  locationmountain in Spring Brook Township, Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania
  elevationbetween 1,760 and 1,780 feet (540 and 540 m)
Mouth  
  location
Monument Creek in Spring Brook Township, Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania
  coordinates
41°19′29″N75°41′17″W / 41.3247°N 75.6880°W / 41.3247; -75.6880 Coordinates: 41°19′29″N75°41′17″W / 41.3247°N 75.6880°W / 41.3247; -75.6880
  elevation
935 ft (285 m)
Length3.4 mi (5.5 km)
Basin features
ProgressionMonument Creek → Spring BrookLackawanna RiverSusquehanna RiverChesapeake Bay
Tributaries 
  leftone unnamed tributary
  righttwo unnamed tributaries

Trout Creek is a tributary of Monument Creek in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 3.4 miles (5.5 km) long and flows through Spring Brook Township. [1] Wild trout naturally reproduce in the creek. It has no named tributaries, but does have three unnamed tributaries. The surficial geology in the vicinity of the creek mainly consists of bedrock, Wisconsinan Till, alluvium, fill, wetlands, and lakes.

Tributary stream or river that flows into a main stem river or lake

A tributary or affluent is a stream or river that flows into a larger stream or main stem river or a lake. A tributary does not flow directly into a sea or ocean. Tributaries and the main stem river drain the surrounding drainage basin of its surface water and groundwater, leading the water out into an ocean.

Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania County in Pennsylvania, United States

Lackawanna County is a county in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 214,437. Its county seat and largest city is Scranton.

Spring Brook Township, Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania Place in Pennsylvania, United States

Spring Brook Township is a township in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 2,768 at the 2010 census.

Contents

Course

Trout Creek begins on a mountain in Spring Brook Township. It flows northwest for a short distance before turning north-northeast for a few miles. The creek almost immediately passes through a small pond and begins flowing down the mountain in a valley. It receives an unnamed tributary from the left and later two more from the right. Its valley then becomes much deeper and narrower and it turns north-northwest for more than a mile. The creek then turns west and a few tenths of a mile further downstream, reaches its confluence with Monument Creek. [1]

Tributaries

Trout Creek has no named tributaries. However, it does have a number of unnamed tributaries. The largest tributary is its first one, which begins in Pittston Township, Luzerne County and flows in a northeasterly direction for nearly a mile to its confluence with Trout Brook. [1]

Geography and geology

The elevation near the mouth of Trout Creek is 935 feet (285 m) above sea level. [2] The elevation of the creek's source is between 1,760 and 1,780 feet (540 and 540 m) above sea level. [1]

River mouth end of a river

A river mouth is the part of a river where the river debouches into another river, a lake, a reservoir, a sea, or an ocean.

Sea level Average level for the surface of the ocean at any given geographical position on the planetary surface

Mean sea level (MSL) is an average level of the surface of one or more of Earth's bodies of water from which heights such as elevation may be measured. The global MSL is a type of vertical datum – a standardised geodetic datum – that is used, for example, as a chart datum in cartography and marine navigation, or, in aviation, as the standard sea level at which atmospheric pressure is measured to calibrate altitude and, consequently, aircraft flight levels. A common and relatively straightforward mean sea-level standard is instead the midpoint between a mean low and mean high tide at a particular location.

River source The starting point of a river

The source, or headwaters, of a river or stream is the furthest place in that river or stream from its estuary or confluence with another river, as measured along the course of the river.

In the lower reaches of Trout Creek, the surficial geology along the valley floor consists of alluvium. The sides of the valley mainly have surficial geology containing bedrock consisting of conglomerate, sandstone, and shale. Further upstream, the surficial geology along the creek mainly consists of a glacial or resedimented till known as Wisconsinan Till. However, large areas of bedrock and some small patches of fill and wetlands are also present. There is also one small lake in the watershed's upper reaches. [3]

Alluvium Loose soil or sediment that is eroded and redeposited in a non-marine setting

Alluvium is loose, unconsolidated soil or sediment that has been eroded, reshaped by water in some form, and redeposited in a non-marine setting. Alluvium is typically made up of a variety of materials, including fine particles of silt and clay and larger particles of sand and gravel. When this loose alluvial material is deposited or cemented into a lithological unit, or lithified, it is called an alluvial deposit.

Bedrock Lithified rock under the regolith

Bedrock in geology is the lithified rock that lies under loose softer material called regolith within the surface of the Earth's crust or other terrestrial planets.

Conglomerate (geology) A coarse-grained clastic sedimentary rock with mainly rounded to subangular clasts

Conglomerate is a coarse-grained clastic sedimentary rock that is composed of a substantial fraction of rounded to subangular gravel-size clasts, e.g., granules, pebbles, cobbles, and boulders, larger than 2 mm (0.079 in) in diameter. Conglomerates form by the consolidation and lithification of gravel. Conglomerates typically contain finer grained sediment, e.g., either sand, silt, clay or combination of them, called matrix by geologists, filling their interstices and are often cemented by calcium carbonate, iron oxide, silica, or hardened clay.

Part of Mount Pisgah is in the watershed of Trout Creek. [3]

Watershed and biology

Most of the watershed of Trout Creek is in Spring Brook Township, Lackawanna County. However, a small area of the upper reaches of the watershed is in Pittston Township, in Luzerne County. [4] Trout Creek is entirely within the United States Geological Survey quadrangle of Avoca. [2]

Wild trout naturally reproduce in Trout Creek from its headwaters downstream to its mouth. [5]

History

Trout Creek was entered into the Geographic Names Information System on August 2, 1979. Its identifier in the Geographic Names Information System is 1189833. [2]

In the early 2000s, the Lackawanna River Watershed Conservation Plan recommended that Spring Brook Township include protection of Trout Creek in their comprehensive plans, as well as their ordinances for land use, zoning, and subdivision. [6]

See also

Related Research Articles

Kingsbury Brook river in the United States of America

Kingsbury Brook is a tributary of Huntington Creek in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 1.5 miles (2.4 km) long and flows through Huntington Township. The watershed of the stream has an area of 1.27 square miles (3.3 km2) and it has two unnamed tributaries. Wild trout naturally reproduce in the stream. The surficial geology in its vicinity mainly consists of alluvium, Wisconsinan Till, Wisconsinan Ice-Contact Stratified Drift, bedrock, and wetlands.

Red Spring Run is a tributary of the Lackawanna River in Lackawanna County and Luzerne County, in Pennsylvania in the United States. It is approximately 1.5 miles (2.4 km) long and flows through Ransom Township in Lackawanna County and Duryea in Luzerne County. The watershed of the stream has an area of 1.25 square miles (3.2 km2). It is designated as a Coldwater Fishery and a Migratory Fishery. The stream has one unnamed tributary. Many reaches of the stream have been affected by mining and abandoned mines. The surficial geology in its vicinity features alluvium, coal dumps, surface mining land, and Wisconsinan Till.

Mill Creek is a tributary of the Lackawanna River in Luzerne County and Lackawanna County, in Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 5.5 miles (8.9 km) long and flows through Pittston Township, Dupont, Avoca, and Duryea in Luzerne County and Moosic in Lackawanna County. The watershed of the creek has an area of 10.6 square miles (27 km2). It is designated as a Coldwater Fishery and a Migratory Fishery. The creek has two named tributaries: Collins Creek and Lidy Creek. The surficial geology in its vicinity includes urban land, coal dumps, surface mining land, Wisconsinan Ice-Contact Stratified Drift, Wisconsinan Till, and bedrock.

Monument Creek is a tributary of Spring Brook in Luzerne County and Lackawanna County, in Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 2.8 miles (4.5 km) long and flows through Pittston Township in Luzerne County and Spring Brook Township. The creek is considered to be a High-Quality Coldwater Fishery. It has one named tributary, which is known as Trout Creek. The surficial geology in the vicinity of Monument Creek consists of bedrock, Wisconsinan Till, alluvium, Wisconsinan Ice-Contact Stratified Drift, and fill.

Green Run is a tributary of Spring Brook in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 4.7 miles (7.6 km) long and flows through Spring Brook Township, Roaring Brook Township, and Scranton. The watershed of the stream has an area of 4.32 square miles (11.2 km2). It is considered to be Class A Wild Trout Waters throughout its entire length. Numerous macroinvertebrate taxa also inhabit the stream. The surficial geology in the vicinity of the stream's lower reaches mainly consists of Wisconsinan Till, bedrock, and Boulder Colluvium.

Rattlesnake Creek is a tributary of Spring Brook in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 5.0 miles (8.0 km) long and flows through Spring Brook Township. The watershed of the creek has an area of 9.18 square miles (23.8 km2). The creek has one named tributary, which is known as Six Springs Creek. Rattlesnake Creek is inhabited by wild trout and part of it is considered to be Class A Wild Trout Waters. A dammed lake known as Maple Lake is located near its headwaters. The surficial geology in the area mainly consists of Wisconsinan Till and bedrock, with some alluvium, Wisconsinan Ice-Contact Stratified Drift, wetlands, and peat bogs.

Plank Bridge Creek is a tributary of Spring Brook in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 2.4 miles (3.9 km) long and flows through Spring Brook Township. The watershed of the creek has an area of 1.26 square miles (3.3 km2). It is inhabited by wild trout throughout its length. The surficial geology in its vicinity mainly consists of Wisconsinan Till, bedrock, Boulder Colluvium, alluvium, and wetlands.

Panther Creek is a tributary of Spring Brook in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 2.7 miles (4.3 km) long and flows through Thornhurst Township, Clifton Township, and Spring Brook Township. The watershed of the creek has an area of 7.18 square miles (18.6 km2). It has one named tributary, which is known as Painter Creek. Panther Creek is considered to be Class A Wild Trout Waters. The surficial geology in its vicinity consists of alluvium, alluvial terrace, Wisconsinan Till, and bedrock.

Painter Creek river in the United States of America

Painter Creek is a tributary of Panther Creek in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 3.4 miles (5.5 km) long and flows through Thornhurst Township and Spring Brook Township. The watershed of the creek has an area of 4.51 square miles (11.7 km2). Wild trout naturally reproduce in the creek and a hiking trail is in its vicinity. The surficial geology in the area consists of Wisconsinan Till, bedrock, and wetlands. A bog known as the Painter Creek Bog is listed on the Lackawanna County Natural Areas Inventory.

Rock Bottom Creek is a tributary of Roaring Brook in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 3.2 miles (5.1 km) long and flows through Jefferson Township and Roaring Brook Township. The watershed of the creek has an area of 3.06 square miles (7.9 km2). Wild trout naturally reproduce within it. The surficial geology in the creek's vicinity consists of Wisconsinan Till, alluvium, bedrock, fill, peat bogs, lakes, and wetlands.

Kellum Creek is a tributary of Roaring Brook in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 2.9 miles (4.7 km) long and flows through Madison Township. The watershed of the creek has an area of 2.56 square miles (6.6 km2). The creek is considered to be Class A Wild Trout Waters. A planned trail is in its vicinity. The surficial geology in the area consists of alluvium, bedrock, peat bogs, wetlands, Boulder Colluvium, and Wisconsinan Till.

Obendoffers Creek is a tributary of the Susquehanna River in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 2.4 miles (3.9 km) long and flows through Exeter Township. The watershed of the creek has an area of 2.08 square miles (5.4 km2). It is designated as a Coldwater Fishery and a Migratory Fishery. The surficial geology in its vicinity consists of alluvium, alluvial fan, Wisconsinan Ice-Contact Stratified Drift, Wisconsinan Till, and bedrock.

Dymond Creek is a tributary of the Susquehanna River in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 3.3 miles (5.3 km) long and flows through Franklin Township and Exeter Township. The watershed of the creek has an area of 2.24 square miles (5.8 km2). The creek is not designated as impaired and its drainage basin is a Coldwater Fishery and a Migratory Fishery. The surficial geology in its vicinity consists of Wisconsinan Till, Wisconsinan Outwash, Wisconsinan Ice-Contact Stratified Drift, alluvium, alluvial fan, and bedrock.

Roaring Run (Bowman Creek tributary) river in the United States of America

Roaring Run is a tributary of Bowman Creek in Wyoming County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 4.9 miles (7.9 km) long and flows through Forkston Township, Noxen Township, and Monroe Township. It has two named tributaries: Newton Run and South Branch Roaring Run. The watershed of Roaring Run has an area of 11.4 square miles (30 km2). It is designated as a High-Quality Coldwater Fishery and a Migratory Fishery and the stream is Class A Wild Trout Waters. The surficial geology in its vicinity consists of alluvium, alluvial terrace, alluvial fan, bedrock, Wisconsinan Till, and Wisconsinan Ice-Contact Stratified Drift. A bridge carrying Pennsylvania Route 29 crosses the stream.

South Branch Roaring Run is a tributary of Roaring Run in Wyoming County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 2.0 miles (3.2 km) long and flows through Noxen Township and Forkston Township. The watershed of the stream has an area of 3.31 square miles (8.6 km2). The surficial geology in its vicinity consists of bedrock, Wisconsinan Till, Wisconsinan Bouldery Till, Wisconsinan Ice-Contact Stratified Drift, and alluvium. South Branch Roaring Run is classified as Class A Wild Trout Waters.

Leonard Creek river in the United States of America

Leonard Creek is a tributary of Bowman Creek in Luzerne County and Wyoming County, in Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 7.2 miles (11.6 km) long and flows through Dallas Township in Luzerne County and Monroe Township in Wyoming County. The watershed of the creek has an area of 17.1 square miles (44 km2). The creek is not designated as an impaired waterbody. The surficial geology in its vicinity consists of Wisconsinan Till, alluvium, Wisconsinan Ice-Contact Stratified Drift, alluvial fan, alluvial terrace, bedrock, and sand and gravel pits.

Beaver Run (Bowman Creek tributary) river in Pennsylvania, United States of America

Beaver Run is a tributary of Bowman Creek in Luzerne County and Wyoming County, in Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 7.7 miles (12.4 km) long and flows through Lake Township in Luzerne County and Noxen Township in Wyoming County. The watershed of the stream has an area of 10.6 square miles (27 km2). It is not designated as an impaired waterbody. The surficial geology in its vicinity includes alluvial fan, alluvial terrace, alluvium, Wisconsinan Till, Wisconsinan Ice-Contact Stratified Drift, fill, wetlands, and bedrock.

Sorber Run river in the United States of America

Sorber Run is a tributary of Bowman Creek in Luzerne County and Wyoming County, in Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 3.1 miles (5.0 km) long and flows through Lake Township in Luzerne County and Noxen Township in Wyoming County. The watershed of the stream has an area of 2.08 square miles (5.4 km2). The surficial geology in the stream's vicinity consists of alluvium and Wisconsinan Till. The watershed is designated as Exceptional Value waters and a Migratory Fishery. The stream is one of two Wilderness Trout Streams in Wyoming County.

Field Brook

Field Brook is a tributary of Tunkhannock Creek in Susquehanna County and Wyoming County, in Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 5.8 miles (9.3 km) long and flows through Lathrop Township in Susquehanna County and Nicholson Township in Wyoming County. The watershed of the stream has an area of 7.41 square miles (19.2 km2). The stream has one named tributary, which is known as East Branch Field Brook. The surficial geology in the vicinity of Field Brook consists of alluvium, Wisconsinan Till, alluvial terrace, alluvial fan, bedrock, wetlands, and a lake. The watershed of the stream is designated as a Coldwater Fishery and a Migratory Fishery.

Brish Run is a tributary of Pine Creek in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 1.5 miles (2.4 km) long and flows through Fairmount Township. The watershed of the stream has an area of 0.66 square miles (1.7 km2). The stream has one unnamed tributary. The surficial geology in the vicinity of Brish Run mostly consists of Wisconsinan Till, but there is alluvium near its mouth and also bedrock in the area. The stream is being considered for wild trout designation.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 United States Geological Survey, The National Map Viewer , retrieved March 29, 2015
  2. 1 2 3 Geographic Names Information System, Feature Detail Report for: Trout Creek , retrieved March 29, 2015
  3. 1 2 Duane D. Braun (2007), Surficial geology of the Avoca 7.5-minute quadrangle, Luzerne and Lackawanna Counties, Pennsylvania, p. 17, retrieved March 29, 2015
  4. Lackawanna River Watershed in Wayne County, Pennsylvania (PDF), archived from the original (PDF) on April 27, 2015, retrieved March 29, 2015
  5. Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (January 2015), Pennsylvania Wild Trout Waters (Natural Reproduction) (PDF), p. 49, retrieved March 29, 2015
  6. Lackawanna River Corridor Association (2001), Lackawanna River Watershed Conservation Plan (PDF), p. 111, retrieved March 29, 2015